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The XXth century dengue pandemic: need for surveillance and research.
World Health Stat Q. 1992; 45(2-3):292-8.WH

Abstract

By the last decade of the XXth century Aedes aegypti and the 4 dengue viruses had spread to nearly all countries of the tropical world. Some 2 billion persons live in dengue-endemic areas with tens of millions infected annually. Dengue pandemics were also documented in the XVIIIth and XIXth centuries; they were contained by organized anti-Aedes aegypti campaigns and urban improvements. The XXth century dengue pandemic has brought with it the simultaneous circulation of multiple serotypes and in its aftermath, endemic dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). Nearly 3 million children have been hospitalized with this syndrome in the past 3 decades, mainly in South-East Asia. Recent outbreaks of DHF/DSS in the Pacific Islands, China, India, Sri Lanka, Cuba and Venezuela are indicators of the high intensity and rapid spread of dengue transmission. The magnitude of the XXth century dengue pandemic requires urgent improvements in early warning surveillance by WHO Member States and the development of the capacity to study underlying mechanisms of the disease. A key research question is why does DHF/DSS not occur with all second dengue infections? Two answers have been suggested: (1) a human resistance gene. Data from the 1981 DHF/DSS epidemic in Cuba have demonstrated the existence in blacks of a resistance gene. The effect of such a gene in reducing disease susceptibility of American and African blacks requires more study. (2) The existence of dengue "biotypes". Some, but not all biotypes may cause DHF/DSS during a second dengue infection.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rockefeller Foundation, New York.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1462664

Citation

Halstead, S B.. "The XXth Century Dengue Pandemic: Need for Surveillance and Research." World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel De Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales, vol. 45, no. 2-3, 1992, pp. 292-8.
Halstead SB. The XXth century dengue pandemic: need for surveillance and research. World Health Stat Q. 1992;45(2-3):292-8.
Halstead, S. B. (1992). The XXth century dengue pandemic: need for surveillance and research. World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel De Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales, 45(2-3), 292-8.
Halstead SB. The XXth Century Dengue Pandemic: Need for Surveillance and Research. World Health Stat Q. 1992;45(2-3):292-8. PubMed PMID: 1462664.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The XXth century dengue pandemic: need for surveillance and research. A1 - Halstead,S B, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez KW - Americas KW - Asia KW - Blacks KW - Caribbean KW - Cuba KW - Cultural Background KW - Demographic Factors KW - Dengue--history KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Ethnic Groups KW - Latin America KW - North America KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Viral Diseases SP - 292 EP - 8 JF - World health statistics quarterly. Rapport trimestriel de statistiques sanitaires mondiales JO - World Health Stat Q VL - 45 IS - 2-3 N2 - By the last decade of the XXth century Aedes aegypti and the 4 dengue viruses had spread to nearly all countries of the tropical world. Some 2 billion persons live in dengue-endemic areas with tens of millions infected annually. Dengue pandemics were also documented in the XVIIIth and XIXth centuries; they were contained by organized anti-Aedes aegypti campaigns and urban improvements. The XXth century dengue pandemic has brought with it the simultaneous circulation of multiple serotypes and in its aftermath, endemic dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). Nearly 3 million children have been hospitalized with this syndrome in the past 3 decades, mainly in South-East Asia. Recent outbreaks of DHF/DSS in the Pacific Islands, China, India, Sri Lanka, Cuba and Venezuela are indicators of the high intensity and rapid spread of dengue transmission. The magnitude of the XXth century dengue pandemic requires urgent improvements in early warning surveillance by WHO Member States and the development of the capacity to study underlying mechanisms of the disease. A key research question is why does DHF/DSS not occur with all second dengue infections? Two answers have been suggested: (1) a human resistance gene. Data from the 1981 DHF/DSS epidemic in Cuba have demonstrated the existence in blacks of a resistance gene. The effect of such a gene in reducing disease susceptibility of American and African blacks requires more study. (2) The existence of dengue "biotypes". Some, but not all biotypes may cause DHF/DSS during a second dengue infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0379-8070 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1462664/The_XXth_century_dengue_pandemic:_need_for_surveillance_and_research_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dengue.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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