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American ginseng leaf: ginsenoside analysis and hypoglycemic activity.
Pharmacol Res. 2004 Feb; 49(2):113-7.PR

Abstract

Previous studies showed that both American ginseng root and American ginseng berry extracts possess hypoglycemic properties. In this study, we investigated whether American ginseng leaves also have similar capabilities. We first analyzed the chemical constituents of American ginseng leaf and determined the content of six major ginsenosides, i.e., Rb(1), Rb(2), Rc, Rd, Re, and Rg(1), by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Subsequently, we evaluated the hypoglycemic effect of American ginseng leaf extract (AGLE) in diabetic ob/ob adult mice. Animals received daily intraperitoneal injections of AGLE 50, 150 mg/kg or vehicle for 12 consecutive days. Fasting blood glucose levels, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), body weight and temperature were measured. On day 5, the 150 mg/kg AGLE group had significantly lower fasting blood glucose levels compared to vehicle-treated mice (223.0+/-13.9 mg/dl versus 258.0+/-14.0 mg/dl, P<0.05), while the blood glucose levels in 50 mg/kg group did not decrease significantly. On day 12, the glucose levels in both AGLE-treated groups were reduced significantly compared to vehicle group (180.0+/-10.0 mg/dl and 220.2+/-19.3 versus 268.0+/-10.0 mg/dl, P<0.01 and <0.05, respectively). IPGTT data showed that both AGLE 150 and 50 mg/kg groups significantly increased the glucose disposal on day 12 compared to the vehicle group. In addition, body weight decreased in ob/ob mice after AGLE treatment, and these body weight changes were accompanied by significant increases in body temperature (P<0.05). Our results suggest that AGLE possesses a significant anti-hyperglycemic and thermogenic activity and may prove to be beneficial in improving the management of type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tang Center for Herbal Medicine Research, The Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 4028, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14643691

Citation

Xie, Jing-Tian, et al. "American Ginseng Leaf: Ginsenoside Analysis and Hypoglycemic Activity." Pharmacological Research, vol. 49, no. 2, 2004, pp. 113-7.
Xie JT, Mehendale SR, Wang A, et al. American ginseng leaf: ginsenoside analysis and hypoglycemic activity. Pharmacol Res. 2004;49(2):113-7.
Xie, J. T., Mehendale, S. R., Wang, A., Han, A. H., Wu, J. A., Osinski, J., & Yuan, C. S. (2004). American ginseng leaf: ginsenoside analysis and hypoglycemic activity. Pharmacological Research, 49(2), 113-7.
Xie JT, et al. American Ginseng Leaf: Ginsenoside Analysis and Hypoglycemic Activity. Pharmacol Res. 2004;49(2):113-7. PubMed PMID: 14643691.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - American ginseng leaf: ginsenoside analysis and hypoglycemic activity. AU - Xie,Jing-Tian, AU - Mehendale,Sangeeta R, AU - Wang,Anbao, AU - Han,Aung H, AU - Wu,Ji An, AU - Osinski,Joachim, AU - Yuan,Chun-Su, PY - 2003/12/4/pubmed PY - 2004/9/10/medline PY - 2003/12/4/entrez SP - 113 EP - 7 JF - Pharmacological research JO - Pharmacol. Res. VL - 49 IS - 2 N2 - Previous studies showed that both American ginseng root and American ginseng berry extracts possess hypoglycemic properties. In this study, we investigated whether American ginseng leaves also have similar capabilities. We first analyzed the chemical constituents of American ginseng leaf and determined the content of six major ginsenosides, i.e., Rb(1), Rb(2), Rc, Rd, Re, and Rg(1), by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Subsequently, we evaluated the hypoglycemic effect of American ginseng leaf extract (AGLE) in diabetic ob/ob adult mice. Animals received daily intraperitoneal injections of AGLE 50, 150 mg/kg or vehicle for 12 consecutive days. Fasting blood glucose levels, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), body weight and temperature were measured. On day 5, the 150 mg/kg AGLE group had significantly lower fasting blood glucose levels compared to vehicle-treated mice (223.0+/-13.9 mg/dl versus 258.0+/-14.0 mg/dl, P<0.05), while the blood glucose levels in 50 mg/kg group did not decrease significantly. On day 12, the glucose levels in both AGLE-treated groups were reduced significantly compared to vehicle group (180.0+/-10.0 mg/dl and 220.2+/-19.3 versus 268.0+/-10.0 mg/dl, P<0.01 and <0.05, respectively). IPGTT data showed that both AGLE 150 and 50 mg/kg groups significantly increased the glucose disposal on day 12 compared to the vehicle group. In addition, body weight decreased in ob/ob mice after AGLE treatment, and these body weight changes were accompanied by significant increases in body temperature (P<0.05). Our results suggest that AGLE possesses a significant anti-hyperglycemic and thermogenic activity and may prove to be beneficial in improving the management of type 2 diabetes. SN - 1043-6618 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14643691/American_ginseng_leaf:_ginsenoside_analysis_and_hypoglycemic_activity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1043661803002792 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -