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Increasing trends of obesity in Sweden between 1996/97 and 2000/01.
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Feb; 28(2):254-61.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

During the last two decades, obesity has reached epidemic proportions in industrialised societies such as Sweden.

OBJECTIVE

The first aim of this study is to examine whether the body mass index (BMI) and obesity increased between 1996/97 and 2000/01 in different subgroups in the Swedish population. The second aim is to examine whether there were any differences in BMI between subgroups of the population, characterised by age, gender, educational status, smoking habits, degree of urbanisation, and country of birth. The third aim is to examine whether BMI increased between the two periods after adjustment for all the explanatory variables.

METHODS

This study is based on two cross-sectional, random samples of the entire population aged 16-84 y, the first from 1996/97 including 5622 men and 5940 women and the second from 2000/01 including 5515 men and 5838 women. To investigate the possible change in obesity between the two periods, a logistic model adjusted for age was applied, after stratification by gender. To study the relationship between BMI and the explanatory variables, and the possible change in the subgroups of the population between the two periods, a linear regression model was used.

RESULTS

The total BMI mean increased by 0.4 units from 1996/97 to 2000/01 for both men and women. The prevalence of obesity also increased to about 10% in 2000/01. In some subgroups, the prevalence of obesity was especially high, for example, men and women aged 55-74 y, men with middle educational status, women with low educational status, former smokers, and Finnish-born men and women.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings illustrate that both BMI and obesity increased in the Swedish population between 1996/97 and 2000/01. This increase in BMI and obesity is most likely due to environmental factors, such as diet and a sedentary lifestyle. Health interventions need to target both certain subgroups and the whole population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Karolinska Institutet, Family Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. kristina.sundquist@klinvet.ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14647184

Citation

Sundquist, K, et al. "Increasing Trends of Obesity in Sweden Between 1996/97 and 2000/01." International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 28, no. 2, 2004, pp. 254-61.
Sundquist K, Qvist J, Johansson SE, et al. Increasing trends of obesity in Sweden between 1996/97 and 2000/01. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004;28(2):254-61.
Sundquist, K., Qvist, J., Johansson, S. E., & Sundquist, J. (2004). Increasing trends of obesity in Sweden between 1996/97 and 2000/01. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 28(2), 254-61.
Sundquist K, et al. Increasing Trends of Obesity in Sweden Between 1996/97 and 2000/01. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004;28(2):254-61. PubMed PMID: 14647184.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increasing trends of obesity in Sweden between 1996/97 and 2000/01. AU - Sundquist,K, AU - Qvist,J, AU - Johansson,S-E, AU - Sundquist,J, PY - 2003/12/3/pubmed PY - 2004/4/13/medline PY - 2003/12/3/entrez SP - 254 EP - 61 JF - International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: During the last two decades, obesity has reached epidemic proportions in industrialised societies such as Sweden. OBJECTIVE: The first aim of this study is to examine whether the body mass index (BMI) and obesity increased between 1996/97 and 2000/01 in different subgroups in the Swedish population. The second aim is to examine whether there were any differences in BMI between subgroups of the population, characterised by age, gender, educational status, smoking habits, degree of urbanisation, and country of birth. The third aim is to examine whether BMI increased between the two periods after adjustment for all the explanatory variables. METHODS: This study is based on two cross-sectional, random samples of the entire population aged 16-84 y, the first from 1996/97 including 5622 men and 5940 women and the second from 2000/01 including 5515 men and 5838 women. To investigate the possible change in obesity between the two periods, a logistic model adjusted for age was applied, after stratification by gender. To study the relationship between BMI and the explanatory variables, and the possible change in the subgroups of the population between the two periods, a linear regression model was used. RESULTS: The total BMI mean increased by 0.4 units from 1996/97 to 2000/01 for both men and women. The prevalence of obesity also increased to about 10% in 2000/01. In some subgroups, the prevalence of obesity was especially high, for example, men and women aged 55-74 y, men with middle educational status, women with low educational status, former smokers, and Finnish-born men and women. CONCLUSIONS: These findings illustrate that both BMI and obesity increased in the Swedish population between 1996/97 and 2000/01. This increase in BMI and obesity is most likely due to environmental factors, such as diet and a sedentary lifestyle. Health interventions need to target both certain subgroups and the whole population. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14647184/Increasing_trends_of_obesity_in_Sweden_between_1996/97_and_2000/01_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=14647184.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -