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A practical approach to increasing intakes of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: use of novel foods enriched with n-3 fats.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Dec; 57(12):1605-12.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the effects of providing a wide range of foodstuffs containing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), occurring naturally or from fortification, on intake and blood and tissue proportions of n-3 PUFA.

DESIGN

Before/after dietary intervention study.

SETTING

Adelaide, Australia.

SUBJECTS

16 healthy males recruited from the community.

INTERVENTIONS

Subjects were provided with a range of foodstuffs naturally containing n-3 PUFA (fresh fish, canned fish, flaxseed meal, canola oil) and items fortified with fish oil (margarine spread, milk, sausages, luncheon meat, french onion dip). Food choices were left to the discretion of each subject. Intake was estimated by diet diary. Blood was collected at-2, 0, 2, and 4 weeks for fatty acid analysis.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Dietary intakes; plasma, platelet, and mononuclear cell phospholipid fatty acids.

RESULTS

Consumption of n-3 PUFA increased significantly: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) from 1.4 to 4.1 g/day (P<0.001), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from 0.03 to 0.51 g/day (P<0.001), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from 0.09 to 1.01 g/day (P<0.001). Linoleic acid (LA) intake decreased from 13.1 to 9.2 g/day (P<0.001). The proportions of EPA and DHA increased significantly in all phospholipid pools examined; plasma EPA from 1.13% of total fatty acids to 3.38% (P<0.001) and DHA from 3.76 to 7.23% (P<0.001); mononuclear cell EPA from 0.40 to 1.25% (P<0.001) and DHA from 2.33 to 4.08% (P<0.001); platelet EPA from 0.41 to 1.2% (P<0.001) and DHA from 1.64 to 3.07% (P<0.001).

CONCLUSION

Incorporating fish oil into a range of novel commercial foods provides the opportunity for wider public consumption of n-3 PUFA with their associated health benefits.

SPONSORSHIP

Dawes Scholarship, Royal Adelaide Hospital.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rheumatology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Tce, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia. robert.metcalf@adelaide.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14647226

Citation

Metcalf, R G., et al. "A Practical Approach to Increasing Intakes of N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Use of Novel Foods Enriched With N-3 Fats." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 57, no. 12, 2003, pp. 1605-12.
Metcalf RG, James MJ, Mantzioris E, et al. A practical approach to increasing intakes of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: use of novel foods enriched with n-3 fats. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(12):1605-12.
Metcalf, R. G., James, M. J., Mantzioris, E., & Cleland, L. G. (2003). A practical approach to increasing intakes of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: use of novel foods enriched with n-3 fats. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 57(12), 1605-12.
Metcalf RG, et al. A Practical Approach to Increasing Intakes of N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Use of Novel Foods Enriched With N-3 Fats. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(12):1605-12. PubMed PMID: 14647226.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A practical approach to increasing intakes of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: use of novel foods enriched with n-3 fats. AU - Metcalf,R G, AU - James,M J, AU - Mantzioris,E, AU - Cleland,L G, PY - 2003/12/4/pubmed PY - 2004/5/5/medline PY - 2003/12/4/entrez SP - 1605 EP - 12 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 57 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of providing a wide range of foodstuffs containing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), occurring naturally or from fortification, on intake and blood and tissue proportions of n-3 PUFA. DESIGN: Before/after dietary intervention study. SETTING: Adelaide, Australia. SUBJECTS: 16 healthy males recruited from the community. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were provided with a range of foodstuffs naturally containing n-3 PUFA (fresh fish, canned fish, flaxseed meal, canola oil) and items fortified with fish oil (margarine spread, milk, sausages, luncheon meat, french onion dip). Food choices were left to the discretion of each subject. Intake was estimated by diet diary. Blood was collected at-2, 0, 2, and 4 weeks for fatty acid analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dietary intakes; plasma, platelet, and mononuclear cell phospholipid fatty acids. RESULTS: Consumption of n-3 PUFA increased significantly: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) from 1.4 to 4.1 g/day (P<0.001), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from 0.03 to 0.51 g/day (P<0.001), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from 0.09 to 1.01 g/day (P<0.001). Linoleic acid (LA) intake decreased from 13.1 to 9.2 g/day (P<0.001). The proportions of EPA and DHA increased significantly in all phospholipid pools examined; plasma EPA from 1.13% of total fatty acids to 3.38% (P<0.001) and DHA from 3.76 to 7.23% (P<0.001); mononuclear cell EPA from 0.40 to 1.25% (P<0.001) and DHA from 2.33 to 4.08% (P<0.001); platelet EPA from 0.41 to 1.2% (P<0.001) and DHA from 1.64 to 3.07% (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Incorporating fish oil into a range of novel commercial foods provides the opportunity for wider public consumption of n-3 PUFA with their associated health benefits. SPONSORSHIP: Dawes Scholarship, Royal Adelaide Hospital. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14647226/A_practical_approach_to_increasing_intakes_of_n_3_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids:_use_of_novel_foods_enriched_with_n_3_fats_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601731 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -