Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Headaches with (ipsilateral) autonomic symptoms.
J Neurol. 2003 Nov; 250(11):1273-8.JN

Abstract

Primary short-lasting headaches broadly divide themselves into those associated with autonomic symptoms, so called trigemino-autonomic cephalgias (TACs), and those with little autonomic syndromes. The trigeminoautonomic cephalgias include cluster headache and paroxysmal hemicranias, in which head pain and cranial autonomic symptoms are prominent. The most striking feature of cluster headache is the circadian and circannual periodicity of the attacks. Inheritance may play a role in some families. The attacks are of extreme intensity, of short duration, occur unilaterally, and are accompanied by symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. Medical treatment includes both acute therapy aimed at aborting individual attacks and prophylactic therapy aimed at preventing recurrent attacks during the cluster period. Some types of trigemino-autonomic headaches, such as paroxysmal hemicrania and hemicrania continua have, unlike cluster headaches, a very robust response to indomethacin, leading to a consideration of indomethacin-sensitive headaches.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Neurology, University of Regensburg, 93053, Regensburg, Germany. arne.may@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14648142

Citation

May, Arne. "Headaches With (ipsilateral) Autonomic Symptoms." Journal of Neurology, vol. 250, no. 11, 2003, pp. 1273-8.
May A. Headaches with (ipsilateral) autonomic symptoms. J Neurol. 2003;250(11):1273-8.
May, A. (2003). Headaches with (ipsilateral) autonomic symptoms. Journal of Neurology, 250(11), 1273-8.
May A. Headaches With (ipsilateral) Autonomic Symptoms. J Neurol. 2003;250(11):1273-8. PubMed PMID: 14648142.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Headaches with (ipsilateral) autonomic symptoms. A1 - May,Arne, PY - 2003/07/28/received PY - 2003/07/30/accepted PY - 2003/12/4/pubmed PY - 2004/1/17/medline PY - 2003/12/4/entrez SP - 1273 EP - 8 JF - Journal of neurology JO - J Neurol VL - 250 IS - 11 N2 - Primary short-lasting headaches broadly divide themselves into those associated with autonomic symptoms, so called trigemino-autonomic cephalgias (TACs), and those with little autonomic syndromes. The trigeminoautonomic cephalgias include cluster headache and paroxysmal hemicranias, in which head pain and cranial autonomic symptoms are prominent. The most striking feature of cluster headache is the circadian and circannual periodicity of the attacks. Inheritance may play a role in some families. The attacks are of extreme intensity, of short duration, occur unilaterally, and are accompanied by symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. Medical treatment includes both acute therapy aimed at aborting individual attacks and prophylactic therapy aimed at preventing recurrent attacks during the cluster period. Some types of trigemino-autonomic headaches, such as paroxysmal hemicrania and hemicrania continua have, unlike cluster headaches, a very robust response to indomethacin, leading to a consideration of indomethacin-sensitive headaches. SN - 0340-5354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14648142/Headaches_with__ipsilateral__autonomic_symptoms_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.