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Association of dental health parameters with oral lesion prevalence in human immunodeficency virus-infected Romanian children.
Pediatr Dent. 2003 Sep-Oct; 25(5):479-84.PD

Abstract

PURPOSE

This study assessed the association of caries, plaque accumulation, gingival health, and antiretroviral therapy (AT) with oral lesion prevalence in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Romanian children.

METHODS

A convenience sample of HIV-infected children who received dental care in 2 hospitals were evaluated for oral lesions, caries (dfs+DFS/total teeth present), plaque (PI, Silness and Löe), and gingival indices (GI, Löe and Silness). Oral lesions were grouped as: (1) extraoral herpetic infections; (2) parotid gland swelling; (3) oral ulcerative lesions; and (4) fungal infections. A standardized operator performed the examinations and photographed the oral lesions for confirmation. Age, gender, and use of AT were documented. Data were analyzed by logistic and multiple regression, Pearson correlation and t test (P<.05).

RESULTS

One hundred four children (mean age=11.7 years) were evaluated. Fungal infections were associated with increased caries rate (P=.002; OR=2.5) and increased GI (P=.01; OR=7.6). Caries, PI, and GI were associated with an increase in oral lesions (r=-0.472, P<.001). AT use was associated with decreased caries (P=.001, t test), but was not associated with decreased oral lesion prevalence.

CONCLUSIONS

Oral lesions, especially candidiasis, are more common in HIV-infected children with higher caries experience, gingival inflammation, and plaque accumulation. In children with limited access to medical care, the role of oral health appears to be important for decreasing the risk of common opportunistic infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The University of Texas Dental Branch, Houston, Tex, USA. jwchen27@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14649612

Citation

Chen, Jung-Wei, et al. "Association of Dental Health Parameters With Oral Lesion Prevalence in Human Immunodeficency Virus-infected Romanian Children." Pediatric Dentistry, vol. 25, no. 5, 2003, pp. 479-84.
Chen JW, Flaitz CM, Wullbrandt B, et al. Association of dental health parameters with oral lesion prevalence in human immunodeficency virus-infected Romanian children. Pediatr Dent. 2003;25(5):479-84.
Chen, J. W., Flaitz, C. M., Wullbrandt, B., & Sexton, J. (2003). Association of dental health parameters with oral lesion prevalence in human immunodeficency virus-infected Romanian children. Pediatric Dentistry, 25(5), 479-84.
Chen JW, et al. Association of Dental Health Parameters With Oral Lesion Prevalence in Human Immunodeficency Virus-infected Romanian Children. Pediatr Dent. 2003 Sep-Oct;25(5):479-84. PubMed PMID: 14649612.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of dental health parameters with oral lesion prevalence in human immunodeficency virus-infected Romanian children. AU - Chen,Jung-Wei, AU - Flaitz,Catherine M, AU - Wullbrandt,Blake, AU - Sexton,John, PY - 2003/12/3/pubmed PY - 2004/1/17/medline PY - 2003/12/3/entrez SP - 479 EP - 84 JF - Pediatric dentistry JO - Pediatr Dent VL - 25 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: This study assessed the association of caries, plaque accumulation, gingival health, and antiretroviral therapy (AT) with oral lesion prevalence in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Romanian children. METHODS: A convenience sample of HIV-infected children who received dental care in 2 hospitals were evaluated for oral lesions, caries (dfs+DFS/total teeth present), plaque (PI, Silness and Löe), and gingival indices (GI, Löe and Silness). Oral lesions were grouped as: (1) extraoral herpetic infections; (2) parotid gland swelling; (3) oral ulcerative lesions; and (4) fungal infections. A standardized operator performed the examinations and photographed the oral lesions for confirmation. Age, gender, and use of AT were documented. Data were analyzed by logistic and multiple regression, Pearson correlation and t test (P<.05). RESULTS: One hundred four children (mean age=11.7 years) were evaluated. Fungal infections were associated with increased caries rate (P=.002; OR=2.5) and increased GI (P=.01; OR=7.6). Caries, PI, and GI were associated with an increase in oral lesions (r=-0.472, P<.001). AT use was associated with decreased caries (P=.001, t test), but was not associated with decreased oral lesion prevalence. CONCLUSIONS: Oral lesions, especially candidiasis, are more common in HIV-infected children with higher caries experience, gingival inflammation, and plaque accumulation. In children with limited access to medical care, the role of oral health appears to be important for decreasing the risk of common opportunistic infections. SN - 0164-1263 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14649612/Association_of_dental_health_parameters_with_oral_lesion_prevalence_in_human_immunodeficency_virus_infected_Romanian_children_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -