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Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal allergen-specific immune responses and clinical outcomes in infants at high risk of atopy: a randomized, controlled trial.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2003; 112(6):1178-84JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is growing interest in the potential role of anti-inflammatory n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the prevention of allergic disease.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to determine whether maternal dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs during pregnancy could modify immune responses in infants.

METHODS

In a randomized, controlled trial 98 atopic, pregnant women received fish oil (3.7 g n-3 PUFAs per day) or placebo from 20 weeks' gestation until delivery. Neonatal PUFA levels and immunologic response to allergens were measured at birth.

RESULTS

Eighty-three women completed the study. Fish oil supplementation (n = 40) achieved significantly higher proportions of n-3 PUFAs in neonatal erythrocyte membranes (mean +/- SD, 17.75% +/- 1.85% as a percentage of total fatty acids) compared with the control group (n = 43, 13.69% +/- 1.22%, P <.001). All neonatal cytokine (IL-5, IL-13, IL-10, and IFN-gamma) responses (to all allergens) tended to be lower in the fish oil group (statistically significant only for IL-10 in response to cat). Although this study was not designed to examine clinical effects, we noted that infants in the fish oil group were 3 times less likely to have a positive skin prick test to egg at 1 year of age (odds ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.11 to 1.02; P =.055). Although there was no difference in the frequency of atopic dermatitis at 1 year of age, infants in the fish oil group also had significantly less severe disease (odds ratio, 0.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 0.94; P =.045).

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest a potential reduction in subsequent infant allergy after maternal PUFA supplementation. More detailed follow-up studies are required in larger cohorts to establish the robustness of these findings and to ascertain their significance in relation to longer-term modification of allergic disease in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14657879

Citation

Dunstan, Janet A., et al. "Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy Modifies Neonatal Allergen-specific Immune Responses and Clinical Outcomes in Infants at High Risk of Atopy: a Randomized, Controlled Trial." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 112, no. 6, 2003, pp. 1178-84.
Dunstan JA, Mori TA, Barden A, et al. Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal allergen-specific immune responses and clinical outcomes in infants at high risk of atopy: a randomized, controlled trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003;112(6):1178-84.
Dunstan, J. A., Mori, T. A., Barden, A., Beilin, L. J., Taylor, A. L., Holt, P. G., & Prescott, S. L. (2003). Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal allergen-specific immune responses and clinical outcomes in infants at high risk of atopy: a randomized, controlled trial. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 112(6), pp. 1178-84.
Dunstan JA, et al. Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy Modifies Neonatal Allergen-specific Immune Responses and Clinical Outcomes in Infants at High Risk of Atopy: a Randomized, Controlled Trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003;112(6):1178-84. PubMed PMID: 14657879.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal allergen-specific immune responses and clinical outcomes in infants at high risk of atopy: a randomized, controlled trial. AU - Dunstan,Janet A, AU - Mori,Trevor A, AU - Barden,Anne, AU - Beilin,Lawrence J, AU - Taylor,Angie L, AU - Holt,Patrick G, AU - Prescott,Susan L, PY - 2003/12/6/pubmed PY - 2004/3/9/medline PY - 2003/12/6/entrez SP - 1178 EP - 84 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. VL - 112 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in the potential role of anti-inflammatory n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the prevention of allergic disease. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether maternal dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs during pregnancy could modify immune responses in infants. METHODS: In a randomized, controlled trial 98 atopic, pregnant women received fish oil (3.7 g n-3 PUFAs per day) or placebo from 20 weeks' gestation until delivery. Neonatal PUFA levels and immunologic response to allergens were measured at birth. RESULTS: Eighty-three women completed the study. Fish oil supplementation (n = 40) achieved significantly higher proportions of n-3 PUFAs in neonatal erythrocyte membranes (mean +/- SD, 17.75% +/- 1.85% as a percentage of total fatty acids) compared with the control group (n = 43, 13.69% +/- 1.22%, P <.001). All neonatal cytokine (IL-5, IL-13, IL-10, and IFN-gamma) responses (to all allergens) tended to be lower in the fish oil group (statistically significant only for IL-10 in response to cat). Although this study was not designed to examine clinical effects, we noted that infants in the fish oil group were 3 times less likely to have a positive skin prick test to egg at 1 year of age (odds ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.11 to 1.02; P =.055). Although there was no difference in the frequency of atopic dermatitis at 1 year of age, infants in the fish oil group also had significantly less severe disease (odds ratio, 0.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 0.94; P =.045). CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest a potential reduction in subsequent infant allergy after maternal PUFA supplementation. More detailed follow-up studies are required in larger cohorts to establish the robustness of these findings and to ascertain their significance in relation to longer-term modification of allergic disease in children. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14657879/Fish_oil_supplementation_in_pregnancy_modifies_neonatal_allergen_specific_immune_responses_and_clinical_outcomes_in_infants_at_high_risk_of_atopy:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091674903022711 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -