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Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men.
J Bone Miner Res. 1992 Nov; 7(11):1291-6.JB

Abstract

Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p < 0.01 to p = 0.0001). Body weight correlated with tibia and whole-body BMD (p < 0.001); age negatively correlated with Ward's triangle BMD (p < 0.01). In stepwise multiple regressions, back strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, Aging Study Unit, VA Medical Center, Palo Alto, California.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1466254

Citation

Snow-Harter, C, et al. "Bone Mineral Density, Muscle Strength, and Recreational Exercise in Men." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 7, no. 11, 1992, pp. 1291-6.
Snow-Harter C, Whalen R, Myburgh K, et al. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men. J Bone Miner Res. 1992;7(11):1291-6.
Snow-Harter, C., Whalen, R., Myburgh, K., Arnaud, S., & Marcus, R. (1992). Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 7(11), 1291-6.
Snow-Harter C, et al. Bone Mineral Density, Muscle Strength, and Recreational Exercise in Men. J Bone Miner Res. 1992;7(11):1291-6. PubMed PMID: 1466254.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men. AU - Snow-Harter,C, AU - Whalen,R, AU - Myburgh,K, AU - Arnaud,S, AU - Marcus,R, PY - 1992/11/1/pubmed PY - 1992/11/1/medline PY - 1992/11/1/entrez KW - NASA Center ARC KW - NASA Discipline Musculoskeletal SP - 1291 EP - 6 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J Bone Miner Res VL - 7 IS - 11 N2 - Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p < 0.01 to p = 0.0001). Body weight correlated with tibia and whole-body BMD (p < 0.001); age negatively correlated with Ward's triangle BMD (p < 0.01). In stepwise multiple regressions, back strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1466254/Bone_mineral_density_muscle_strength_and_recreational_exercise_in_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.5650071108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -