Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Detecting dementia with the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test and the Mini-Mental State Examination.
Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2004 Jan; 19(1):89-104.AC

Abstract

The Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were administered to 323 non-demented elderly and 70 individuals who meet DSM-IV criteria for dementia in order to compare the validity of these two measures for detecting mild dementia and for the two most common dementia subtypes, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). The study was conducted in an elderly, ethnically diverse community-dwelling population. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated over a range of clinically relevant cut scores for each test. We analyzed the influence of age, education, reading ability and sex on test performance using logistic regression models. When sensitivity is held constant at 0.69, the specificity for the HVLT total recall was 0.89 and the MMSE 0.82 for all dementias (P=.10). Age, sex and education did not significantly influence test performance for either test in this sample. Results were similar for AD and VaD. However, while adding a measure of reading ability to the regression models did not affect the overall dementia model, it resulted in improved specificities when combined with the MMSE for AD and combined with the HVLT for VaD. Additional tests such as reading ability can improve discrimination of dementia subtypes. The modest sensitivity of either the HVLT or the MMSE alone suggests that further neuropsychological evaluation is required to confirm dementia diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Einstein Aging Study, Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York City, NY 10461, USA. Kuslansky@aecom.yu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14670382

Citation

Kuslansky, Gail, et al. "Detecting Dementia With the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test and the Mini-Mental State Examination." Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology : the Official Journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists, vol. 19, no. 1, 2004, pp. 89-104.
Kuslansky G, Katz M, Verghese J, et al. Detecting dementia with the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2004;19(1):89-104.
Kuslansky, G., Katz, M., Verghese, J., Hall, C. B., Lapuerta, P., LaRuffa, G., & Lipton, R. B. (2004). Detecting dementia with the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology : the Official Journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists, 19(1), 89-104.
Kuslansky G, et al. Detecting Dementia With the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2004;19(1):89-104. PubMed PMID: 14670382.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detecting dementia with the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test and the Mini-Mental State Examination. AU - Kuslansky,Gail, AU - Katz,Mindy, AU - Verghese,Joe, AU - Hall,Charles B, AU - Lapuerta,Pablo, AU - LaRuffa,Gia, AU - Lipton,Richard B, PY - 2003/12/13/pubmed PY - 2004/5/7/medline PY - 2003/12/13/entrez SP - 89 EP - 104 JF - Archives of clinical neuropsychology : the official journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists JO - Arch Clin Neuropsychol VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - The Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were administered to 323 non-demented elderly and 70 individuals who meet DSM-IV criteria for dementia in order to compare the validity of these two measures for detecting mild dementia and for the two most common dementia subtypes, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). The study was conducted in an elderly, ethnically diverse community-dwelling population. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated over a range of clinically relevant cut scores for each test. We analyzed the influence of age, education, reading ability and sex on test performance using logistic regression models. When sensitivity is held constant at 0.69, the specificity for the HVLT total recall was 0.89 and the MMSE 0.82 for all dementias (P=.10). Age, sex and education did not significantly influence test performance for either test in this sample. Results were similar for AD and VaD. However, while adding a measure of reading ability to the regression models did not affect the overall dementia model, it resulted in improved specificities when combined with the MMSE for AD and combined with the HVLT for VaD. Additional tests such as reading ability can improve discrimination of dementia subtypes. The modest sensitivity of either the HVLT or the MMSE alone suggests that further neuropsychological evaluation is required to confirm dementia diagnosis. SN - 0887-6177 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14670382/Detecting_dementia_with_the_Hopkins_Verbal_Learning_Test_and_the_Mini_Mental_State_Examination_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alzheimersdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -