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The buried bumper syndrome: migration of internal bumper of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube into the abdominal wall.
J Gastroenterol. 2003; 38(11):1077-80.JG

Abstract

A percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube was inserted in a 59-year-old man who was undergoing craniotomy due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, because it was estimated that he could not have oral intake for a period of 4 weeks. Seventy days after the insertion, the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube was replaced because of its accidental removal by the patient. Two months after the second insertion, the tube had to be replaced due to nonfunctioning. The buried bumper syndrome was diagnosed on physical examination, and was confirmed by endoscopy, with findings of mucosal dimpling and nonvisualization of the internal bumper. The tube was removed by external traction without any abdominal incision, and the same site was used for the insertion of a replacement tube over a guidewire. The patient remained symptom-free during 18 months of follow-up.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Surgical Unit, Marmara University Institute of Gastroenterology, Istanbul, PK: 53, 81532, Basibuyuk, Maltepe, Turkey.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14673726

Citation

Gençosmanoğlu, Rasim, et al. "The Buried Bumper Syndrome: Migration of Internal Bumper of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube Into the Abdominal Wall." Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 38, no. 11, 2003, pp. 1077-80.
Gençosmanoğlu R, Koç D, Tözün N. The buried bumper syndrome: migration of internal bumper of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube into the abdominal wall. J Gastroenterol. 2003;38(11):1077-80.
Gençosmanoğlu, R., Koç, D., & Tözün, N. (2003). The buried bumper syndrome: migration of internal bumper of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube into the abdominal wall. Journal of Gastroenterology, 38(11), 1077-80.
Gençosmanoğlu R, Koç D, Tözün N. The Buried Bumper Syndrome: Migration of Internal Bumper of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube Into the Abdominal Wall. J Gastroenterol. 2003;38(11):1077-80. PubMed PMID: 14673726.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The buried bumper syndrome: migration of internal bumper of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube into the abdominal wall. AU - Gençosmanoğlu,Rasim, AU - Koç,Demet, AU - Tözün,Nurdan, PY - 2002/09/09/received PY - 2003/01/10/accepted PY - 2003/12/16/pubmed PY - 2004/3/25/medline PY - 2003/12/16/entrez SP - 1077 EP - 80 JF - Journal of gastroenterology JO - J Gastroenterol VL - 38 IS - 11 N2 - A percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube was inserted in a 59-year-old man who was undergoing craniotomy due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, because it was estimated that he could not have oral intake for a period of 4 weeks. Seventy days after the insertion, the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube was replaced because of its accidental removal by the patient. Two months after the second insertion, the tube had to be replaced due to nonfunctioning. The buried bumper syndrome was diagnosed on physical examination, and was confirmed by endoscopy, with findings of mucosal dimpling and nonvisualization of the internal bumper. The tube was removed by external traction without any abdominal incision, and the same site was used for the insertion of a replacement tube over a guidewire. The patient remained symptom-free during 18 months of follow-up. SN - 0944-1174 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14673726/The_buried_bumper_syndrome:_migration_of_internal_bumper_of_percutaneous_endoscopic_gastrostomy_tube_into_the_abdominal_wall_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00535-003-1199-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -