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Stress responsive neurohormones in depression and anxiety.
Pharmacopsychiatry 2003; 36 Suppl 3:S207-14P

Abstract

Clinical and preclinical studies have gathered substantial evidence that stress response alterations play a major role in the development of major depression, panic disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. The stress response, the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) system and its modulation by CRH, corticosteroids and their receptors as well as the role of natriuretic peptides and neuroactive steroids are described. Examplarily, we review the role of the HPA system in major depression, panic disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder as well as its possible relevance for treatment. Impaired glucocorticoid receptor function in major depression is associated with an excessive release of neurohormones, like CRH to which a number of signs and symptoms characteristic of depression can be ascribed. In panic disorder, a role of central CRH in panic attacks has been suggested. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is causally involved in sodium lactate-induced panic attacks. Furthermore, preclinical and clinical data on its anxiolytic activity suggest that non-peptidergic ANP receptor ligands may be of potential use in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Recent data further suggest a role of 3alpha-reduced neuroactive steroids in major depression, panic attacks and panic disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder is characterized by a peripheral hyporesponsive HPA-system and elevated CRH concentrations in CSF. This dissociation is probably related to an increased risk for this disorder. Antidepressants are effective both in depression and anxiety disorders and have major effects on the HPA-system, especially on glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Normalization of HPA-system abnormalities is a strong predictor of the clinical course, at least in major depression and panic disorder. CRH-R1 or glucorticoid receptor antagonists and ANP receptor agonists are currently being studied and may provide future treatment options more closely related to the pathophysiology of the disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Campus Charité-Mitte (CCM), Berlin, Germany. andreas.stroehle@charite.deNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14677081

Citation

Ströhle, A, and F Holsboer. "Stress Responsive Neurohormones in Depression and Anxiety." Pharmacopsychiatry, vol. 36 Suppl 3, 2003, pp. S207-14.
Ströhle A, Holsboer F. Stress responsive neurohormones in depression and anxiety. Pharmacopsychiatry. 2003;36 Suppl 3:S207-14.
Ströhle, A., & Holsboer, F. (2003). Stress responsive neurohormones in depression and anxiety. Pharmacopsychiatry, 36 Suppl 3, pp. S207-14.
Ströhle A, Holsboer F. Stress Responsive Neurohormones in Depression and Anxiety. Pharmacopsychiatry. 2003;36 Suppl 3:S207-14. PubMed PMID: 14677081.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stress responsive neurohormones in depression and anxiety. AU - Ströhle,A, AU - Holsboer,F, PY - 2003/12/17/pubmed PY - 2004/2/28/medline PY - 2003/12/17/entrez SP - S207 EP - 14 JF - Pharmacopsychiatry JO - Pharmacopsychiatry VL - 36 Suppl 3 N2 - Clinical and preclinical studies have gathered substantial evidence that stress response alterations play a major role in the development of major depression, panic disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. The stress response, the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) system and its modulation by CRH, corticosteroids and their receptors as well as the role of natriuretic peptides and neuroactive steroids are described. Examplarily, we review the role of the HPA system in major depression, panic disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder as well as its possible relevance for treatment. Impaired glucocorticoid receptor function in major depression is associated with an excessive release of neurohormones, like CRH to which a number of signs and symptoms characteristic of depression can be ascribed. In panic disorder, a role of central CRH in panic attacks has been suggested. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is causally involved in sodium lactate-induced panic attacks. Furthermore, preclinical and clinical data on its anxiolytic activity suggest that non-peptidergic ANP receptor ligands may be of potential use in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Recent data further suggest a role of 3alpha-reduced neuroactive steroids in major depression, panic attacks and panic disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder is characterized by a peripheral hyporesponsive HPA-system and elevated CRH concentrations in CSF. This dissociation is probably related to an increased risk for this disorder. Antidepressants are effective both in depression and anxiety disorders and have major effects on the HPA-system, especially on glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Normalization of HPA-system abnormalities is a strong predictor of the clinical course, at least in major depression and panic disorder. CRH-R1 or glucorticoid receptor antagonists and ANP receptor agonists are currently being studied and may provide future treatment options more closely related to the pathophysiology of the disorders. SN - 0176-3679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14677081/Stress_responsive_neurohormones_in_depression_and_anxiety_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2003-45132 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -