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Severe acute respiratory syndrome.
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003 Dec; 7(12):1117-30.IJ

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a new disease that poses a threat to international health. The SARS epidemic earlier this year affected more than 30 countries and regions, with a cumulative global total of 8098 cases. It is caused by a novel coronavirus, probably of animal origin. The mean incubation period is 6.4 days (range 2-11 days). Patients usually present with high fever, chills, myalgia and dry cough, with or without chest X-ray evidence of pneumonia at the onset of disease. A history of contact with or travel to an area with local transmission is common. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, as a valid rapid diagnostic test is not yet available. There is no specific antiviral therapy for this disease, and no controlled clinical trial for any treatment modality has been conducted. In several retrospective studies steroids have been shown to be useful in a proportion of patients who deteriorated despite antibiotics and supportive treatment. SARS has a high morbidity (about 25% required intensive care) and fatality (9.6%). A high index of suspicion for the disease, isolation of patients, strict observation of infection control practices and compliance with use of personal protective equipment are necessary to prevent nosocomial infection. Contact tracing and quarantine are essential measures to prevent community spread of disease. Prevention of future outbreaks requires strengthening of infection control practices in hospitals, development of a rapid diagnostic test and a vaccine, and removal of any animal reservoir and environmental conditions that led to the spread of the disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, SAR, China. mmwchan@hkucc.hku.hkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14677886

Citation

Chan-Yeung, M, et al. "Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome." The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease : the Official Journal of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, vol. 7, no. 12, 2003, pp. 1117-30.
Chan-Yeung M, Ooi GC, Hui DS, et al. Severe acute respiratory syndrome. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003;7(12):1117-30.
Chan-Yeung, M., Ooi, G. C., Hui, D. S., Ho, P. L., & Tsang, K. W. (2003). Severe acute respiratory syndrome. The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease : the Official Journal of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 7(12), 1117-30.
Chan-Yeung M, et al. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003;7(12):1117-30. PubMed PMID: 14677886.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe acute respiratory syndrome. AU - Chan-Yeung,M, AU - Ooi,G C, AU - Hui,D S, AU - Ho,P L, AU - Tsang,K W, PY - 2003/12/18/pubmed PY - 2004/4/8/medline PY - 2003/12/18/entrez SP - 1117 EP - 30 JF - The international journal of tuberculosis and lung disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease JO - Int J Tuberc Lung Dis VL - 7 IS - 12 N2 - Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a new disease that poses a threat to international health. The SARS epidemic earlier this year affected more than 30 countries and regions, with a cumulative global total of 8098 cases. It is caused by a novel coronavirus, probably of animal origin. The mean incubation period is 6.4 days (range 2-11 days). Patients usually present with high fever, chills, myalgia and dry cough, with or without chest X-ray evidence of pneumonia at the onset of disease. A history of contact with or travel to an area with local transmission is common. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, as a valid rapid diagnostic test is not yet available. There is no specific antiviral therapy for this disease, and no controlled clinical trial for any treatment modality has been conducted. In several retrospective studies steroids have been shown to be useful in a proportion of patients who deteriorated despite antibiotics and supportive treatment. SARS has a high morbidity (about 25% required intensive care) and fatality (9.6%). A high index of suspicion for the disease, isolation of patients, strict observation of infection control practices and compliance with use of personal protective equipment are necessary to prevent nosocomial infection. Contact tracing and quarantine are essential measures to prevent community spread of disease. Prevention of future outbreaks requires strengthening of infection control practices in hospitals, development of a rapid diagnostic test and a vaccine, and removal of any animal reservoir and environmental conditions that led to the spread of the disease. SN - 1027-3719 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14677886/Severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1027-3719&volume=7&issue=12&spage=1117&aulast=Chan-Yeung DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -