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Erythorbic acid is a potent enhancer of nonheme-iron absorption.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan; 79(1):99-102.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Erythorbic acid, a stereoisomer of ascorbic acid with similar physicochemical properties, is widely used as an antioxidant in processed foods.

OBJECTIVES

The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effect of erythorbic acid on iron absorption from ferrous sulfate at molar ratios of 2:1 and 4:1 (relative to iron) and to compare the effect of erythorbic acid directly with that of ascorbic acid at a molar ratio of 4:1.

DESIGN

Iron absorption from iron-fortified cereal was measured in 10 women on the basis of erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes ((57)Fe or (58)Fe) 14 d after administration. Each woman consumed 4 ferrous-sulfate-fortified test meals (containing 5 mg Fe/meal) with or without added erythorbic or ascorbic acid. The data were evaluated by use of paired t tests, and the results are presented as geometric means.

RESULTS

Iron absorption from the test meal without any added enhancer was 4.1%. The addition of erythorbic acid (at molar ratios of 2:1 and 4:1 relative to iron) increased iron absorption 2.6-fold (10.8%; P < 0.0001) and 4.6-fold (18.8%; P < 0.0001), respectively. The addition of ascorbic acid (molar ratio of 4:1) increased iron absorption 2.9-fold (11.7%; P = 0.0004). At a molar ratio of 4:1, erythorbic acid was 1.6-fold (P = 0.0002) as potent an enhancer of iron absorption as was ascorbic acid.

CONCLUSION

Although erythorbic acid is a potent enhancer of iron absorption, its lack of antiscorbutic activity limits its usefulness in iron-fortification programs. However, it may play a major role in enhancing iron bioavailability from mixed diets that include foods preserved with erythorbic acid.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Rueschlikon, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14684404

Citation

Fidler, Meredith C., et al. "Erythorbic Acid Is a Potent Enhancer of Nonheme-iron Absorption." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 79, no. 1, 2004, pp. 99-102.
Fidler MC, Davidsson L, Zeder C, et al. Erythorbic acid is a potent enhancer of nonheme-iron absorption. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;79(1):99-102.
Fidler, M. C., Davidsson, L., Zeder, C., & Hurrell, R. F. (2004). Erythorbic acid is a potent enhancer of nonheme-iron absorption. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 79(1), 99-102.
Fidler MC, et al. Erythorbic Acid Is a Potent Enhancer of Nonheme-iron Absorption. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;79(1):99-102. PubMed PMID: 14684404.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Erythorbic acid is a potent enhancer of nonheme-iron absorption. AU - Fidler,Meredith C, AU - Davidsson,Lena, AU - Zeder,Christophe, AU - Hurrell,Richard F, PY - 2003/12/20/pubmed PY - 2004/1/21/medline PY - 2003/12/20/entrez SP - 99 EP - 102 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 79 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Erythorbic acid, a stereoisomer of ascorbic acid with similar physicochemical properties, is widely used as an antioxidant in processed foods. OBJECTIVES: The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effect of erythorbic acid on iron absorption from ferrous sulfate at molar ratios of 2:1 and 4:1 (relative to iron) and to compare the effect of erythorbic acid directly with that of ascorbic acid at a molar ratio of 4:1. DESIGN: Iron absorption from iron-fortified cereal was measured in 10 women on the basis of erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes ((57)Fe or (58)Fe) 14 d after administration. Each woman consumed 4 ferrous-sulfate-fortified test meals (containing 5 mg Fe/meal) with or without added erythorbic or ascorbic acid. The data were evaluated by use of paired t tests, and the results are presented as geometric means. RESULTS: Iron absorption from the test meal without any added enhancer was 4.1%. The addition of erythorbic acid (at molar ratios of 2:1 and 4:1 relative to iron) increased iron absorption 2.6-fold (10.8%; P < 0.0001) and 4.6-fold (18.8%; P < 0.0001), respectively. The addition of ascorbic acid (molar ratio of 4:1) increased iron absorption 2.9-fold (11.7%; P = 0.0004). At a molar ratio of 4:1, erythorbic acid was 1.6-fold (P = 0.0002) as potent an enhancer of iron absorption as was ascorbic acid. CONCLUSION: Although erythorbic acid is a potent enhancer of iron absorption, its lack of antiscorbutic activity limits its usefulness in iron-fortification programs. However, it may play a major role in enhancing iron bioavailability from mixed diets that include foods preserved with erythorbic acid. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14684404/Erythorbic_acid_is_a_potent_enhancer_of_nonheme_iron_absorption_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/79.1.99 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -