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Specific alcoholic beverage and blood pressure in a middle-aged Japanese population: the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) Study.
J Hum Hypertens. 2004 Jan; 18(1):9-16.JH

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of popular Japanese alcoholic beverages on blood pressure. We performed a cross-sectional study on 4335 Japanese male workers using baseline data from an intervention study. We defined six groups according to the type of alcoholic beverage that provided two-thirds of the subject's total alcohol consumption: beer, sake (rice wine), shochu (traditional Japanese spirits), whiskey, wine and others. The partial regression coefficients of daily alcohol intake (1 drink=11.5 g of ethanol) to systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were 0.87(P<0.001, standard error (s.e.)=0.09) and 0.77(P<0.001, s.e.=0.06), respectively. A comparison among the types of alcoholic beverages mainly consumed revealed significant differences in SBP and DBP. Both SBP and DBP were highest in the shochu group. However, an analysis of covariance adjusting for total alcohol consumption resulted in the disappearance of these differences. Although after adjustment for total alcohol consumption, the shochu group exhibited a significant positive association with 'high-normal blood pressure or greater' (odds ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.95) compared with the beer group, this significant relation disappeared after adjusting for the body mass index (BMI), urinary sodium and potassium excretion. The pressor effect, per se, of popular Japanese alcoholic beverages on blood pressure may not be different among the types of alcoholic beverages after adjusting for other lifestyle factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Science, Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan. tokamura@belle.shiga-med.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14688805

Citation

Okamura, T, et al. "Specific Alcoholic Beverage and Blood Pressure in a Middle-aged Japanese Population: the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) Study." Journal of Human Hypertension, vol. 18, no. 1, 2004, pp. 9-16.
Okamura T, Tanaka T, Yoshita K, et al. Specific alcoholic beverage and blood pressure in a middle-aged Japanese population: the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) Study. J Hum Hypertens. 2004;18(1):9-16.
Okamura, T., Tanaka, T., Yoshita, K., Chiba, N., Takebayashi, T., Kikuchi, Y., Tamaki, J., Tamura, U., Minai, J., Kadowaki, T., Miura, K., Nakagawa, H., Tanihara, S., Okayama, A., & Ueshima, H. (2004). Specific alcoholic beverage and blood pressure in a middle-aged Japanese population: the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) Study. Journal of Human Hypertension, 18(1), 9-16.
Okamura T, et al. Specific Alcoholic Beverage and Blood Pressure in a Middle-aged Japanese Population: the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) Study. J Hum Hypertens. 2004;18(1):9-16. PubMed PMID: 14688805.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Specific alcoholic beverage and blood pressure in a middle-aged Japanese population: the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) Study. AU - Okamura,T, AU - Tanaka,T, AU - Yoshita,K, AU - Chiba,N, AU - Takebayashi,T, AU - Kikuchi,Y, AU - Tamaki,J, AU - Tamura,U, AU - Minai,J, AU - Kadowaki,T, AU - Miura,K, AU - Nakagawa,H, AU - Tanihara,S, AU - Okayama,A, AU - Ueshima,H, AU - ,, PY - 2003/12/23/pubmed PY - 2004/11/4/medline PY - 2003/12/23/entrez SP - 9 EP - 16 JF - Journal of human hypertension JO - J Hum Hypertens VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of popular Japanese alcoholic beverages on blood pressure. We performed a cross-sectional study on 4335 Japanese male workers using baseline data from an intervention study. We defined six groups according to the type of alcoholic beverage that provided two-thirds of the subject's total alcohol consumption: beer, sake (rice wine), shochu (traditional Japanese spirits), whiskey, wine and others. The partial regression coefficients of daily alcohol intake (1 drink=11.5 g of ethanol) to systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were 0.87(P<0.001, standard error (s.e.)=0.09) and 0.77(P<0.001, s.e.=0.06), respectively. A comparison among the types of alcoholic beverages mainly consumed revealed significant differences in SBP and DBP. Both SBP and DBP were highest in the shochu group. However, an analysis of covariance adjusting for total alcohol consumption resulted in the disappearance of these differences. Although after adjustment for total alcohol consumption, the shochu group exhibited a significant positive association with 'high-normal blood pressure or greater' (odds ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.95) compared with the beer group, this significant relation disappeared after adjusting for the body mass index (BMI), urinary sodium and potassium excretion. The pressor effect, per se, of popular Japanese alcoholic beverages on blood pressure may not be different among the types of alcoholic beverages after adjusting for other lifestyle factors. SN - 0950-9240 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14688805/Specific_alcoholic_beverage_and_blood_pressure_in_a_middle_aged_Japanese_population:_the_High_risk_and_Population_Strategy_for_Occupational_Health_Promotion__HIPOP_OHP__Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.jhh.1001627 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -