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Benzodiazepine receptor deficiency and tinnitus.
Int Tinnitus J. 2000; 6(2):98-111.IT

Abstract

As regards the symptom of a predominantly central tinnitus of the severe, disabling type, it has been hypothesized that a deficiency in the benzodiazepine receptor exists in the medial temporal lobe system of brain and is directly related to affect impairments including anxiety, stress, depression, and fear. This hypothesis has been investigated with single-photon emission computed tomography using the benzodiazepine radioligand 123I Iomazenil. Visual analysis revealed preliminary results of diminished benzodiazepine-binding sites in the medial temporal cortex of all patients with severe tinnitus (N = 6), a finding that is consistent with the hypothesis implicating GABAergic mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disorder. An abnormal gamma-aminobutyric acid--A benzodiazepine receptor density may be an objective neurochemical measure of the severity of a central-type tinnitus and a rationale for treatment. Clinical correlation with the history, clinical course of the patient, and stress questionnaire are presented.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Martha Entenmann Tinnitus Research Center, Inc., Health Sciences Center at Brooklyn, State University of New York, Box 1239, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11203, USA. metrc@inch.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14689626

Citation

Shulman, A, et al. "Benzodiazepine Receptor Deficiency and Tinnitus." The International Tinnitus Journal, vol. 6, no. 2, 2000, pp. 98-111.
Shulman A, Strashun AM, Seibyl JP, et al. Benzodiazepine receptor deficiency and tinnitus. Int Tinnitus J. 2000;6(2):98-111.
Shulman, A., Strashun, A. M., Seibyl, J. P., Daftary, A., & Goldstein, B. (2000). Benzodiazepine receptor deficiency and tinnitus. The International Tinnitus Journal, 6(2), 98-111.
Shulman A, et al. Benzodiazepine Receptor Deficiency and Tinnitus. Int Tinnitus J. 2000;6(2):98-111. PubMed PMID: 14689626.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Benzodiazepine receptor deficiency and tinnitus. AU - Shulman,A, AU - Strashun,A M, AU - Seibyl,J P, AU - Daftary,A, AU - Goldstein,B, PY - 2003/12/24/pubmed PY - 2004/1/22/medline PY - 2003/12/24/entrez SP - 98 EP - 111 JF - The international tinnitus journal JO - Int Tinnitus J VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - As regards the symptom of a predominantly central tinnitus of the severe, disabling type, it has been hypothesized that a deficiency in the benzodiazepine receptor exists in the medial temporal lobe system of brain and is directly related to affect impairments including anxiety, stress, depression, and fear. This hypothesis has been investigated with single-photon emission computed tomography using the benzodiazepine radioligand 123I Iomazenil. Visual analysis revealed preliminary results of diminished benzodiazepine-binding sites in the medial temporal cortex of all patients with severe tinnitus (N = 6), a finding that is consistent with the hypothesis implicating GABAergic mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disorder. An abnormal gamma-aminobutyric acid--A benzodiazepine receptor density may be an objective neurochemical measure of the severity of a central-type tinnitus and a rationale for treatment. Clinical correlation with the history, clinical course of the patient, and stress questionnaire are presented. SN - 0946-5448 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14689626/Benzodiazepine_receptor_deficiency_and_tinnitus_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9653 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -