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Oil and squalene in amaranthus grain and leaf.
J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Dec 31; 51(27):7913-20.JA

Abstract

Amaranthus grain of 104 genotypes from 30 species was investigated for oil and squalene contents and fatty acid profiles. The overall average oil content in Amaranthus grain was 5.0%, ranging from 1.9 to 8.7%. Squalene concentration in extracted oils ranged from trace to 7.3%, with an average concentration of 4.2%. The average contents of three major fatty acids in Amaranthus grain were 22.2, 29.1, and 44.6% for palmitic, oleic, and linoleic, respectively. The average fat content in dried mature leaves of 45 Amaranthus genotypes was 1.63%, ranging from 1.08 to 2.18%. The squalene concentration in leaf lipid extracts averaged 0.26%, ranging from trace to 0.77%, which is much lower than that from seeds. The major fatty acids of leaf extracts were linolenic, linoleic, and palmitic. Linolenic ranged from 56.5 to 62.0% of total fatty acids; linoleic, from 15.5 to 24.7%; and palmitic acid, from 13.5 to 15.5%. As for the fatty acid compositions at different growth stages, fatty acid content in leaf lipid was lower in mature leaves than in young leaves. The saturated/unsaturated ratio decreased when the leaf grew to maturity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on compositional characteristics of grain. The first two components accounted for 70% of the total variance (38.3 and 21.7%, respectively). There was a positive correlation between oil content and squalene yield, and a negative correlations were found between linoleic and either of the other two major fatty acids, palmitic and oleic. The taxonomic relationship among the species was also elucidated by PCA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Botany, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14690373

Citation

He, Han-Ping, and Harold Corke. "Oil and Squalene in Amaranthus Grain and Leaf." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 51, no. 27, 2003, pp. 7913-20.
He HP, Corke H. Oil and squalene in amaranthus grain and leaf. J Agric Food Chem. 2003;51(27):7913-20.
He, H. P., & Corke, H. (2003). Oil and squalene in amaranthus grain and leaf. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(27), 7913-20.
He HP, Corke H. Oil and Squalene in Amaranthus Grain and Leaf. J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Dec 31;51(27):7913-20. PubMed PMID: 14690373.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oil and squalene in amaranthus grain and leaf. AU - He,Han-Ping, AU - Corke,Harold, PY - 2003/12/24/pubmed PY - 2004/3/6/medline PY - 2003/12/24/entrez SP - 7913 EP - 20 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 51 IS - 27 N2 - Amaranthus grain of 104 genotypes from 30 species was investigated for oil and squalene contents and fatty acid profiles. The overall average oil content in Amaranthus grain was 5.0%, ranging from 1.9 to 8.7%. Squalene concentration in extracted oils ranged from trace to 7.3%, with an average concentration of 4.2%. The average contents of three major fatty acids in Amaranthus grain were 22.2, 29.1, and 44.6% for palmitic, oleic, and linoleic, respectively. The average fat content in dried mature leaves of 45 Amaranthus genotypes was 1.63%, ranging from 1.08 to 2.18%. The squalene concentration in leaf lipid extracts averaged 0.26%, ranging from trace to 0.77%, which is much lower than that from seeds. The major fatty acids of leaf extracts were linolenic, linoleic, and palmitic. Linolenic ranged from 56.5 to 62.0% of total fatty acids; linoleic, from 15.5 to 24.7%; and palmitic acid, from 13.5 to 15.5%. As for the fatty acid compositions at different growth stages, fatty acid content in leaf lipid was lower in mature leaves than in young leaves. The saturated/unsaturated ratio decreased when the leaf grew to maturity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on compositional characteristics of grain. The first two components accounted for 70% of the total variance (38.3 and 21.7%, respectively). There was a positive correlation between oil content and squalene yield, and a negative correlations were found between linoleic and either of the other two major fatty acids, palmitic and oleic. The taxonomic relationship among the species was also elucidated by PCA. SN - 0021-8561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14690373/Oil_and_squalene_in_amaranthus_grain_and_leaf_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf030489q DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -