Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Impact of obesity on biochemical control after radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer: a report by the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database study group.
J Clin Oncol. 2004 Feb 01; 22(3):446-53.JC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Given the limited information regarding the impact of obesity on treatment outcomes for prostate cancer, we sought to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and cancer control after radical prostatectomy (RP).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

We compared clinicopathologic and biochemical outcome information across BMI groups from 1,106 men treated with RP between 1988 and 2002. Multivariate analysis was used to determine if BMI significantly predicted adverse pathology or biochemical recurrence.

RESULTS

Obesity was related to year of surgery (P <.001) and race (P <.001), with black men having the highest obesity rates. Obese patients had higher biopsy and pathologic grade tumors (P <.001). On multivariate analysis, BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) was associated with a trend for higher rates of positive surgical margins (P =.008). Overweight patients (BMI, 25 to 30 kg/m(2)) had a significantly decreased risk of seminal vesicle invasion (P =.039). After controlling for all preoperative clinical variables including year of surgery, BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) significantly predicted biochemical failure after RP (P =.002). After controlling for surgical margin status, BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) remained a significant predictor of biochemical failure (P =.012). There was a trend for BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) to be associated with higher failure rates than BMI between 30 and 35 kg/m(2) (P =.053).

CONCLUSION

The percentage of obese men undergoing RP in our data set doubled in the last 10 years. Obesity was associated with higher-grade tumors, a trend toward increased risk of positive surgical margins, and higher biochemical failure rates among men treated with RP. A BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) was associated with a higher risk of failure than a BMI between 30 and 35 kg/m(2).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287-2101, USA. sfreedl1@jhmi.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14691122

Citation

Freedland, Stephen J., et al. "Impact of Obesity On Biochemical Control After Radical Prostatectomy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: a Report By the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital Database Study Group." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, vol. 22, no. 3, 2004, pp. 446-53.
Freedland SJ, Aronson WJ, Kane CJ, et al. Impact of obesity on biochemical control after radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer: a report by the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database study group. J Clin Oncol. 2004;22(3):446-53.
Freedland, S. J., Aronson, W. J., Kane, C. J., Presti, J. C., Amling, C. L., Elashoff, D., & Terris, M. K. (2004). Impact of obesity on biochemical control after radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer: a report by the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database study group. Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 22(3), 446-53.
Freedland SJ, et al. Impact of Obesity On Biochemical Control After Radical Prostatectomy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: a Report By the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital Database Study Group. J Clin Oncol. 2004 Feb 1;22(3):446-53. PubMed PMID: 14691122.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of obesity on biochemical control after radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer: a report by the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database study group. AU - Freedland,Stephen J, AU - Aronson,William J, AU - Kane,Christopher J, AU - Presti,Joseph C,Jr AU - Amling,Christopher L, AU - Elashoff,David, AU - Terris,Martha K, Y1 - 2003/12/22/ PY - 2003/12/24/pubmed PY - 2004/2/26/medline PY - 2003/12/24/entrez SP - 446 EP - 53 JF - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology JO - J. Clin. Oncol. VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: Given the limited information regarding the impact of obesity on treatment outcomes for prostate cancer, we sought to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and cancer control after radical prostatectomy (RP). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We compared clinicopathologic and biochemical outcome information across BMI groups from 1,106 men treated with RP between 1988 and 2002. Multivariate analysis was used to determine if BMI significantly predicted adverse pathology or biochemical recurrence. RESULTS: Obesity was related to year of surgery (P <.001) and race (P <.001), with black men having the highest obesity rates. Obese patients had higher biopsy and pathologic grade tumors (P <.001). On multivariate analysis, BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) was associated with a trend for higher rates of positive surgical margins (P =.008). Overweight patients (BMI, 25 to 30 kg/m(2)) had a significantly decreased risk of seminal vesicle invasion (P =.039). After controlling for all preoperative clinical variables including year of surgery, BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) significantly predicted biochemical failure after RP (P =.002). After controlling for surgical margin status, BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) remained a significant predictor of biochemical failure (P =.012). There was a trend for BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) to be associated with higher failure rates than BMI between 30 and 35 kg/m(2) (P =.053). CONCLUSION: The percentage of obese men undergoing RP in our data set doubled in the last 10 years. Obesity was associated with higher-grade tumors, a trend toward increased risk of positive surgical margins, and higher biochemical failure rates among men treated with RP. A BMI > or = 35 kg/m(2) was associated with a higher risk of failure than a BMI between 30 and 35 kg/m(2). SN - 0732-183X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14691122/Impact_of_obesity_on_biochemical_control_after_radical_prostatectomy_for_clinically_localized_prostate_cancer:_a_report_by_the_Shared_Equal_Access_Regional_Cancer_Hospital_database_study_group_ L2 - http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2004.04.181?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -