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Body size and composition and prostate cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Dec; 12(12):1417-21.CE

Abstract

Reported associations between body measurements and the risk of prostate cancer are weak and inconsistent, possibly because some measures used do not differentiate between adipose and nonadipose tissue, body components that would theoretically have different associations with prostate cancer. Some studies have addressed this problem by estimating lean body mass from subjects' age, height, and weight. In a prospective cohort study of men 27-75 years of age at recruitment in 1990-1994, body measurements were taken by trained interviewers. Nonadipose and adipose mass were calculated from bioelectric impedance analysis. Incident prostate cancers were ascertained by use of the population cancer registry. Altogether 16,336 men contributed 113,535 person-years and 477 cancers, of which 79 were "aggressive," to the analysis. We found no overall association between prostate cancer and any anthropometric measurement. Analysis stratified by cancer aggressiveness revealed modest associations between measures of adiposity and the risk of aggressive disease. On the basis of the WHO cut points and compared with men in the normal range of body mass index, the risk ratio for obese men was 2.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.1). For each 10-kg increase in fat mass, the risk ratio was 1.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.8). Energy imbalance may play a role in the development of aggressive prostate cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Centre, The Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14693731

Citation

MacInnis, Robert J., et al. "Body Size and Composition and Prostate Cancer Risk." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 12, no. 12, 2003, pp. 1417-21.
MacInnis RJ, English DR, Gertig DM, et al. Body size and composition and prostate cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003;12(12):1417-21.
MacInnis, R. J., English, D. R., Gertig, D. M., Hopper, J. L., & Giles, G. G. (2003). Body size and composition and prostate cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 12(12), 1417-21.
MacInnis RJ, et al. Body Size and Composition and Prostate Cancer Risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003;12(12):1417-21. PubMed PMID: 14693731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body size and composition and prostate cancer risk. AU - MacInnis,Robert J, AU - English,Dallas R, AU - Gertig,Dorota M, AU - Hopper,John L, AU - Giles,Graham G, PY - 2003/12/25/pubmed PY - 2004/4/24/medline PY - 2003/12/25/entrez SP - 1417 EP - 21 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 12 IS - 12 N2 - Reported associations between body measurements and the risk of prostate cancer are weak and inconsistent, possibly because some measures used do not differentiate between adipose and nonadipose tissue, body components that would theoretically have different associations with prostate cancer. Some studies have addressed this problem by estimating lean body mass from subjects' age, height, and weight. In a prospective cohort study of men 27-75 years of age at recruitment in 1990-1994, body measurements were taken by trained interviewers. Nonadipose and adipose mass were calculated from bioelectric impedance analysis. Incident prostate cancers were ascertained by use of the population cancer registry. Altogether 16,336 men contributed 113,535 person-years and 477 cancers, of which 79 were "aggressive," to the analysis. We found no overall association between prostate cancer and any anthropometric measurement. Analysis stratified by cancer aggressiveness revealed modest associations between measures of adiposity and the risk of aggressive disease. On the basis of the WHO cut points and compared with men in the normal range of body mass index, the risk ratio for obese men was 2.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.1). For each 10-kg increase in fat mass, the risk ratio was 1.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.8). Energy imbalance may play a role in the development of aggressive prostate cancer. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14693731/Body_size_and_composition_and_prostate_cancer_risk_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=14693731 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -