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Virological significance of low-level hepatitis B virus infection in patients with hepatitis C virus associated liver disease.
J Med Virol. 2004 Feb; 72(2):223-9.JM

Abstract

The clinical and virological significance of low-level viremia by hepatitis B virus (HBV) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients remains unclear. HBV-DNA and HCV-RNA were, therefore, quantitatively analyzed in livers and sera from co-infected patients. HBV-DNA and HCV-RNA were quantitated using real-time detection of polymerase chain reaction (RTD-PCR), based on Taq-Man chemistry, in 220 non-HCV-infected healthy volunteers and 93 HCV-infected patients without detectable HBsAg. Serum HBV-DNA was detected in 4 (1.8%) of 220 non-HCV-infected healthy volunteers and 32 (34.4%) of 93 HCV-infected patients without detectable HBsAg. HCV-infected patients displayed higher frequency of HBV infection than healthy volunteers (P < 0.0001). Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was more frequent among co-infected patients than among HCV mono-infected patients (P < 0.001). However, quantities of HBV-DNA in sera from co-infected patients were very low (8-19,000 copies/ml). HBV-DNA was detected in liver tissue from co-infected patients at 2-20 copies per 100 hepatocytes, accounting for 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 of HBsAg positive patients. In livers of patients with HCC and HCV or HBV mono-infection, the viruses existed predominantly in non-cancerous tissue, with levels 10- to 1,000-fold and 1- to 100-fold higher than in cancerous tissue, respectively. In contrast, patients co-infected with HCV and HBV displayed decreased HBV levels in non-cancerous tissue, but no change in cancerous tissue. These results indicate that low-level HBV infection exists in HCV-infected patients. HCC was more common among HCV/HBV co-infected patients than among HCV mono-infected patients. HCV might initiate hepatocarcinogenesis, but does not necessarily determine progression to HCC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Liver Unit, The Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14695663

Citation

Tanaka, Takeshi, et al. "Virological Significance of Low-level Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Associated Liver Disease." Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 72, no. 2, 2004, pp. 223-9.
Tanaka T, Inoue K, Hayashi Y, et al. Virological significance of low-level hepatitis B virus infection in patients with hepatitis C virus associated liver disease. J Med Virol. 2004;72(2):223-9.
Tanaka, T., Inoue, K., Hayashi, Y., Abe, A., Tsukiyama-Kohara, K., Nuriya, H., Aoki, Y., Kawaguchi, R., Kubota, K., Yoshiba, M., Koike, M., Tanaka, S., & Kohara, M. (2004). Virological significance of low-level hepatitis B virus infection in patients with hepatitis C virus associated liver disease. Journal of Medical Virology, 72(2), 223-9.
Tanaka T, et al. Virological Significance of Low-level Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Associated Liver Disease. J Med Virol. 2004;72(2):223-9. PubMed PMID: 14695663.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Virological significance of low-level hepatitis B virus infection in patients with hepatitis C virus associated liver disease. AU - Tanaka,Takeshi, AU - Inoue,Kazuaki, AU - Hayashi,Yukiko, AU - Abe,Aki, AU - Tsukiyama-Kohara,Kyoko, AU - Nuriya,Hideko, AU - Aoki,Yoshikazu, AU - Kawaguchi,Ryuji, AU - Kubota,Kiichi, AU - Yoshiba,Makoto, AU - Koike,Morio, AU - Tanaka,Satoshi, AU - Kohara,Michinori, PY - 2003/12/26/pubmed PY - 2004/4/23/medline PY - 2003/12/26/entrez SP - 223 EP - 9 JF - Journal of medical virology JO - J. Med. Virol. VL - 72 IS - 2 N2 - The clinical and virological significance of low-level viremia by hepatitis B virus (HBV) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients remains unclear. HBV-DNA and HCV-RNA were, therefore, quantitatively analyzed in livers and sera from co-infected patients. HBV-DNA and HCV-RNA were quantitated using real-time detection of polymerase chain reaction (RTD-PCR), based on Taq-Man chemistry, in 220 non-HCV-infected healthy volunteers and 93 HCV-infected patients without detectable HBsAg. Serum HBV-DNA was detected in 4 (1.8%) of 220 non-HCV-infected healthy volunteers and 32 (34.4%) of 93 HCV-infected patients without detectable HBsAg. HCV-infected patients displayed higher frequency of HBV infection than healthy volunteers (P < 0.0001). Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was more frequent among co-infected patients than among HCV mono-infected patients (P < 0.001). However, quantities of HBV-DNA in sera from co-infected patients were very low (8-19,000 copies/ml). HBV-DNA was detected in liver tissue from co-infected patients at 2-20 copies per 100 hepatocytes, accounting for 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 of HBsAg positive patients. In livers of patients with HCC and HCV or HBV mono-infection, the viruses existed predominantly in non-cancerous tissue, with levels 10- to 1,000-fold and 1- to 100-fold higher than in cancerous tissue, respectively. In contrast, patients co-infected with HCV and HBV displayed decreased HBV levels in non-cancerous tissue, but no change in cancerous tissue. These results indicate that low-level HBV infection exists in HCV-infected patients. HCC was more common among HCV/HBV co-infected patients than among HCV mono-infected patients. HCV might initiate hepatocarcinogenesis, but does not necessarily determine progression to HCC. SN - 0146-6615 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14695663/Virological_significance_of_low_level_hepatitis_B_virus_infection_in_patients_with_hepatitis_C_virus_associated_liver_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.10566 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -