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Transitions in infants' and toddlers' beverage patterns.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Jan; 104(1 Suppl 1):s45-50.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe transitions and patterns in infants' and toddlers' beverage intakes, with focus on nonmilk beverages.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional study was conducted by telephone to obtain a 24-hour dietary recall of infants' and toddlers' food intakes, as reported by mothers or other primary caregivers.

SUBJECTS

A nationwide sample of infants and toddlers (n=3,022) ages 4 to 24 months, who participated in the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS).

ANALYSES

Beverages were categorized as total milks (ie, breast milk, infant formulas, cow's milk, soy milk, goat's milk), 100% juices, fruit drinks, carbonated beverages, water, and "other." Analyses included means +/- standard deviations, percentages, frequencies, nutrient densities, and linear regression.

RESULTS

Beverages provided 84% of total daily food energy for infants 4 to 6 months of age, decreasing to 36% at ages 19 to 24 months. Apple juice and apple-flavored fruit drinks were the most frequently consumed beverages in the 100% juice and fruit drink categories, respectively. Juices, fruit drinks, and carbonated beverages appeared to displace milk in toddlers' diets (P<.0001).

APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS

This research shows that beverages make important contributions to infants' and toddlers' energy and nutrient needs, but they must be wisely chosen. Registered dietitians should advise parents and caregivers that excessive intakes of any beverage, including milks and 100% juices, may displace other foods and beverages in the diet and/or contribute to excess food energy (kcal). Further research is needed to define excessive amounts in each beverage category, and such guidance could be very useful to parents and caregivers of infants and toddlers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutrition Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14702017

Citation

Skinner, Jean D., et al. "Transitions in Infants' and Toddlers' Beverage Patterns." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 104, no. 1 Suppl 1, 2004, pp. s45-50.
Skinner JD, Ziegler P, Ponza M. Transitions in infants' and toddlers' beverage patterns. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(1 Suppl 1):s45-50.
Skinner, J. D., Ziegler, P., & Ponza, M. (2004). Transitions in infants' and toddlers' beverage patterns. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104(1 Suppl 1), s45-50.
Skinner JD, Ziegler P, Ponza M. Transitions in Infants' and Toddlers' Beverage Patterns. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(1 Suppl 1):s45-50. PubMed PMID: 14702017.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transitions in infants' and toddlers' beverage patterns. AU - Skinner,Jean D, AU - Ziegler,Paula, AU - Ponza,Michael, PY - 2004/1/1/pubmed PY - 2004/1/30/medline PY - 2004/1/1/entrez SP - s45 EP - 50 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 104 IS - 1 Suppl 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe transitions and patterns in infants' and toddlers' beverage intakes, with focus on nonmilk beverages. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted by telephone to obtain a 24-hour dietary recall of infants' and toddlers' food intakes, as reported by mothers or other primary caregivers. SUBJECTS: A nationwide sample of infants and toddlers (n=3,022) ages 4 to 24 months, who participated in the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS). ANALYSES: Beverages were categorized as total milks (ie, breast milk, infant formulas, cow's milk, soy milk, goat's milk), 100% juices, fruit drinks, carbonated beverages, water, and "other." Analyses included means +/- standard deviations, percentages, frequencies, nutrient densities, and linear regression. RESULTS: Beverages provided 84% of total daily food energy for infants 4 to 6 months of age, decreasing to 36% at ages 19 to 24 months. Apple juice and apple-flavored fruit drinks were the most frequently consumed beverages in the 100% juice and fruit drink categories, respectively. Juices, fruit drinks, and carbonated beverages appeared to displace milk in toddlers' diets (P<.0001). APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS: This research shows that beverages make important contributions to infants' and toddlers' energy and nutrient needs, but they must be wisely chosen. Registered dietitians should advise parents and caregivers that excessive intakes of any beverage, including milks and 100% juices, may displace other foods and beverages in the diet and/or contribute to excess food energy (kcal). Further research is needed to define excessive amounts in each beverage category, and such guidance could be very useful to parents and caregivers of infants and toddlers. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14702017/Transitions_in_infants'_and_toddlers'_beverage_patterns_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822303014950 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -