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Posttraumatic stress disorder and health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome.
Am J Psychiatry. 2004 Jan; 161(1):45-52.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Intensive care often means exposure to physical and psychological stress, with long-lasting emotional sequelae for most patients. Psychiatric morbidity and negative effects on health-related quality of life were assessed in long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

METHOD

Forty-six long-term survivors were enrolled in a psychiatric follow-up study. All patients had received standard, protocol-driven treatment during intensive care. The median follow-up time was 8 years after treatment. DSM-IV was used for psychiatric diagnosis. Psychological tests were performed to measure posttraumatic stress symptoms; depression; state anxiety; somatization; symptoms regarding concentration, attention, and short-term memory; social support; and health-related quality of life.

RESULTS

At time of discharge, 20 of the patients suffered from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and four from sub-PTSD. At follow-up, 11 patients continued to suffer from PTSD and eight from sub-PTSD. The patients with PTSD demonstrated a pronounced tendency for somatization and state anxiety. Among the groups with PTSD, sub-PTSD, and no PTSD, there were no statistically significant differences regarding social support and symptoms of cognitive dysfunction. Those with PTSD showed major impairments in some dimensions of health-related quality of life, whereas those without PTSD had scores that were in the range of the general population. Except for duration of stay on the intensive care unit, neither age, gender, sociodemographic variables, premorbid psychopathology, nor initial severity of illness discriminated between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome seem to face a major risk of PTSD and major impairments in health-related quality of life in the long term.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Karl-Franzens-University, Graz, Austria. hans-peter.kapfhammer@klinikum-graz.atNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14702249

Citation

Kapfhammer, Hans P., et al. "Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Health-related Quality of Life in Long-term Survivors of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 161, no. 1, 2004, pp. 45-52.
Kapfhammer HP, Rothenhäusler HB, Krauseneck T, et al. Posttraumatic stress disorder and health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Am J Psychiatry. 2004;161(1):45-52.
Kapfhammer, H. P., Rothenhäusler, H. B., Krauseneck, T., Stoll, C., & Schelling, G. (2004). Posttraumatic stress disorder and health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 161(1), 45-52.
Kapfhammer HP, et al. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Health-related Quality of Life in Long-term Survivors of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Am J Psychiatry. 2004;161(1):45-52. PubMed PMID: 14702249.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Posttraumatic stress disorder and health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome. AU - Kapfhammer,Hans P, AU - Rothenhäusler,Hans B, AU - Krauseneck,Till, AU - Stoll,Christian, AU - Schelling,Gustav, PY - 2004/1/2/pubmed PY - 2004/2/27/medline PY - 2004/1/2/entrez SP - 45 EP - 52 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 161 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Intensive care often means exposure to physical and psychological stress, with long-lasting emotional sequelae for most patients. Psychiatric morbidity and negative effects on health-related quality of life were assessed in long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome. METHOD: Forty-six long-term survivors were enrolled in a psychiatric follow-up study. All patients had received standard, protocol-driven treatment during intensive care. The median follow-up time was 8 years after treatment. DSM-IV was used for psychiatric diagnosis. Psychological tests were performed to measure posttraumatic stress symptoms; depression; state anxiety; somatization; symptoms regarding concentration, attention, and short-term memory; social support; and health-related quality of life. RESULTS: At time of discharge, 20 of the patients suffered from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and four from sub-PTSD. At follow-up, 11 patients continued to suffer from PTSD and eight from sub-PTSD. The patients with PTSD demonstrated a pronounced tendency for somatization and state anxiety. Among the groups with PTSD, sub-PTSD, and no PTSD, there were no statistically significant differences regarding social support and symptoms of cognitive dysfunction. Those with PTSD showed major impairments in some dimensions of health-related quality of life, whereas those without PTSD had scores that were in the range of the general population. Except for duration of stay on the intensive care unit, neither age, gender, sociodemographic variables, premorbid psychopathology, nor initial severity of illness discriminated between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome seem to face a major risk of PTSD and major impairments in health-related quality of life in the long term. SN - 0002-953X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14702249/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder_and_health_related_quality_of_life_in_long_term_survivors_of_acute_respiratory_distress_syndrome_ L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.161.1.45?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -