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Higher fat intake and lower fruit and vegetables intakes are associated with greater acculturation among Mexicans living in Washington State.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Jan; 104(1):51-7.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine associations of diet with acculturation among Hispanic immigrants from Mexico to Washington state and to compare dietary patterns of Hispanic with non-Hispanic white residents.

DESIGN

Data are part of the baseline assessment for a community-randomized cancer prevention trial. The Fat-Related Diet Habits questionnaire and the National 5-A-Day for Better Health program dietary assessment instruments were used to collect data on fat and fruit and vegetable intake, respectively. Data were also collected on demographic characteristics and acculturation status.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

A total of 1,689 adult Hispanic and non-Hispanic white residents of 20 communities in the Yakima Valley, WA, completed in-person interviews.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED

Mixed model regression analyses tested associations of acculturation with diet. These models compared the fat and the fruit and vegetable intake of Hispanics vs non-Hispanic white residents. Additional analyses compared the diets of highly acculturated Hispanics with low-acculturated Hispanics. All models included age, sex, income, and education and were also adjusted for the random effect of community.

RESULTS

Dietary patterns varied by ethnicity and acculturation status. On average, compared with non-Hispanic white residents, Hispanics consumed one more serving of fruits and vegetables per day (P<.001). Dietary habits changed as Hispanics acculturated to the United States. Highly acculturated Hispanics ate fewer servings of fruits and vegetables per day compared with those not highly acculturated (P<.05). Highly acculturated Hispanics had slightly higher, but not statistically significant, scores on the Fat-Related Diet Habits questionnaire, which corresponds to a higher fat intake, compared with low-acculturated Hispanics. The early dietary changes made on acculturation included adding fat at the table to breads and potatoes.

APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS

Nutrition professionals should encourage their Hispanic clients to maintain their traditional dietary practices, such as a high intake of fruits and vegetables and eating bread and potatoes without added fat.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109-1024, USA. mneuhous@fhcrc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14702584

Citation

Neuhouser, Marian L., et al. "Higher Fat Intake and Lower Fruit and Vegetables Intakes Are Associated With Greater Acculturation Among Mexicans Living in Washington State." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 104, no. 1, 2004, pp. 51-7.
Neuhouser ML, Thompson B, Coronado GD, et al. Higher fat intake and lower fruit and vegetables intakes are associated with greater acculturation among Mexicans living in Washington State. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(1):51-7.
Neuhouser, M. L., Thompson, B., Coronado, G. D., & Solomon, C. C. (2004). Higher fat intake and lower fruit and vegetables intakes are associated with greater acculturation among Mexicans living in Washington State. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104(1), 51-7.
Neuhouser ML, et al. Higher Fat Intake and Lower Fruit and Vegetables Intakes Are Associated With Greater Acculturation Among Mexicans Living in Washington State. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(1):51-7. PubMed PMID: 14702584.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Higher fat intake and lower fruit and vegetables intakes are associated with greater acculturation among Mexicans living in Washington State. AU - Neuhouser,Marian L, AU - Thompson,Beti, AU - Coronado,Gloria D, AU - Solomon,Cam C, PY - 2004/1/2/pubmed PY - 2004/2/14/medline PY - 2004/1/2/entrez SP - 51 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 104 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine associations of diet with acculturation among Hispanic immigrants from Mexico to Washington state and to compare dietary patterns of Hispanic with non-Hispanic white residents. DESIGN: Data are part of the baseline assessment for a community-randomized cancer prevention trial. The Fat-Related Diet Habits questionnaire and the National 5-A-Day for Better Health program dietary assessment instruments were used to collect data on fat and fruit and vegetable intake, respectively. Data were also collected on demographic characteristics and acculturation status. SUBJECTS/SETTING: A total of 1,689 adult Hispanic and non-Hispanic white residents of 20 communities in the Yakima Valley, WA, completed in-person interviews. STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Mixed model regression analyses tested associations of acculturation with diet. These models compared the fat and the fruit and vegetable intake of Hispanics vs non-Hispanic white residents. Additional analyses compared the diets of highly acculturated Hispanics with low-acculturated Hispanics. All models included age, sex, income, and education and were also adjusted for the random effect of community. RESULTS: Dietary patterns varied by ethnicity and acculturation status. On average, compared with non-Hispanic white residents, Hispanics consumed one more serving of fruits and vegetables per day (P<.001). Dietary habits changed as Hispanics acculturated to the United States. Highly acculturated Hispanics ate fewer servings of fruits and vegetables per day compared with those not highly acculturated (P<.05). Highly acculturated Hispanics had slightly higher, but not statistically significant, scores on the Fat-Related Diet Habits questionnaire, which corresponds to a higher fat intake, compared with low-acculturated Hispanics. The early dietary changes made on acculturation included adding fat at the table to breads and potatoes. APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS: Nutrition professionals should encourage their Hispanic clients to maintain their traditional dietary practices, such as a high intake of fruits and vegetables and eating bread and potatoes without added fat. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14702584/Higher_fat_intake_and_lower_fruit_and_vegetables_intakes_are_associated_with_greater_acculturation_among_Mexicans_living_in_Washington_State_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822303014469 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -