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Long-term study on the effects of visual biofeedback and muscle training as a therapeutic modality in pelvic floor dyssynergia and slow-transit constipation.

Abstract

PURPOSE

Biofeedback training has been shown as an effective therapeutic measure in patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia, at least in the short term. Long-term effects have received less attention. Moreover, its effects in patients with slow-transit constipation have been scarcely investigated. This study was designed to assess in an objective way the medium- and long-term effects of biofeedback and muscle training in patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia and slow-transit constipation.

METHODS

Twenty-four patients (14 with pelvic floor dyssynergia and 10 with slow transit) meeting the Rome II criteria for constipation, and unresponsive to conventional treatments, entered the study. Clinical evaluation and anorectal manometry were performed basally and three months after a cycle of electromyographic biofeedback and muscle training; moreover, a clinical interview was obtained one year after biofeedback. Patients with slow-transit constipation also had colonic transit time reassessed at one year.

RESULTS

Clinical variables (abdominal pain, straining, number of evacuations/week, use of laxatives) all significantly improved in both groups at three-month assessment; anorectal manometric variables remained unchanged, apart from a significant decrease of sensation threshold in the pelvic floor dyssynergia group and of the maximum rectal tolerable volume in the slow-transit constipation group. At one-year control, 50 percent of patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia still maintained a beneficial effect from biofeedback, whereas only 20 percent of those complaining of slow-transit constipation did so. Moreover, the latter displayed no improvement in colonic transit time.

CONCLUSIONS

In our experience, patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia are likely to have continued benefit from biofeedback training in the time course, whereas its effects on slow-transit constipation seems to be maximal in the short-term course.

Authors+Show Affiliations

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Servizio di Endoscopia e Motilità Intestinale, Cattedra di Medicina Interna, Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Università di Torino, Torino, Italy.

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Source

Diseases of the colon and rectum 47:1 2004 Jan pg 90-5

MeSH

Adult
Ataxia
Biofeedback, Psychology
Constipation
Electromyography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Transit
Humans
Male
Manometry
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction
Pelvic Floor
Psychomotor Performance
Rectum
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14702645

Citation

Battaglia, Edda, et al. "Long-term Study On the Effects of Visual Biofeedback and Muscle Training as a Therapeutic Modality in Pelvic Floor Dyssynergia and Slow-transit Constipation." Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, vol. 47, no. 1, 2004, pp. 90-5.
Battaglia E, Serra AM, Buonafede G, et al. Long-term study on the effects of visual biofeedback and muscle training as a therapeutic modality in pelvic floor dyssynergia and slow-transit constipation. Dis Colon Rectum. 2004;47(1):90-5.
Battaglia, E., Serra, A. M., Buonafede, G., Dughera, L., Chistolini, F., Morelli, A., ... Bassotti, G. (2004). Long-term study on the effects of visual biofeedback and muscle training as a therapeutic modality in pelvic floor dyssynergia and slow-transit constipation. Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, 47(1), pp. 90-5.
Battaglia E, et al. Long-term Study On the Effects of Visual Biofeedback and Muscle Training as a Therapeutic Modality in Pelvic Floor Dyssynergia and Slow-transit Constipation. Dis Colon Rectum. 2004;47(1):90-5. PubMed PMID: 14702645.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term study on the effects of visual biofeedback and muscle training as a therapeutic modality in pelvic floor dyssynergia and slow-transit constipation. AU - Battaglia,Edda, AU - Serra,Anna Maria, AU - Buonafede,Giuseppina, AU - Dughera,Luca, AU - Chistolini,Fabio, AU - Morelli,Antonio, AU - Emanuelli,Giorgio, AU - Bassotti,Gabrio, Y1 - 2004/01/02/ PY - 2004/1/2/pubmed PY - 2004/2/11/medline PY - 2004/1/2/entrez SP - 90 EP - 5 JF - Diseases of the colon and rectum JO - Dis. Colon Rectum VL - 47 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Biofeedback training has been shown as an effective therapeutic measure in patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia, at least in the short term. Long-term effects have received less attention. Moreover, its effects in patients with slow-transit constipation have been scarcely investigated. This study was designed to assess in an objective way the medium- and long-term effects of biofeedback and muscle training in patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia and slow-transit constipation. METHODS: Twenty-four patients (14 with pelvic floor dyssynergia and 10 with slow transit) meeting the Rome II criteria for constipation, and unresponsive to conventional treatments, entered the study. Clinical evaluation and anorectal manometry were performed basally and three months after a cycle of electromyographic biofeedback and muscle training; moreover, a clinical interview was obtained one year after biofeedback. Patients with slow-transit constipation also had colonic transit time reassessed at one year. RESULTS: Clinical variables (abdominal pain, straining, number of evacuations/week, use of laxatives) all significantly improved in both groups at three-month assessment; anorectal manometric variables remained unchanged, apart from a significant decrease of sensation threshold in the pelvic floor dyssynergia group and of the maximum rectal tolerable volume in the slow-transit constipation group. At one-year control, 50 percent of patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia still maintained a beneficial effect from biofeedback, whereas only 20 percent of those complaining of slow-transit constipation did so. Moreover, the latter displayed no improvement in colonic transit time. CONCLUSIONS: In our experience, patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia are likely to have continued benefit from biofeedback training in the time course, whereas its effects on slow-transit constipation seems to be maximal in the short-term course. SN - 0012-3706 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14702645/Long_term_study_on_the_effects_of_visual_biofeedback_and_muscle_training_as_a_therapeutic_modality_in_pelvic_floor_dyssynergia_and_slow_transit_constipation_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -