Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Nutrient intake and diet quality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus on a culturally sensitive cholesterol lowering dietary program.
J Rheumatol. 2004 Jan; 31(1):71-5.JR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of a culturally sensitive cholesterol lowering dietary program on energy, protein, fiber, vitamin and mineral intake, diet quality, and hemoglobin levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

METHODS

Seventeen patients with SLE were randomized to a Step II diet intervention group or a control group for 12 weeks. The diet intervention was made up of weekly group sessions during the first 6 weeks followed by telephone counseling every 2 weeks for the last 6 weeks. Food intake was assessed by 3-day food record at baseline, 6, and 12 weeks. Diet quality was assessed by expressing the nutrients as a percentage of the Dietary Reference Intakes of the US National Academy of Sciences, or as a percentage of the nutrient guidelines by the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. Between- and within-group changes in nutrient intakes were assessed by repeated measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

The changes in nutrient intakes were not significantly different between the groups for any of the nonfat nutrients except vitamin B12 (p = 0.05), which decreased in the diet group and increased in the control group. Within-group analysis showed a significant reduction (p = 0.0003 to 0.02) in the diet group in energy and sodium intake at 6 and 12 weeks and B12 intake at 12 weeks compared to the respective baseline values (28-32%, 37-41%, and 43%, respectively). Sodium intake decreased to 66-71% of the total sodium allowance (< 2400 mg per day) in the diet group. The intervention was successful in maintaining adequate intakes or even increasing intakes of most nutrients except B12, dietary fiber, folate, calcium, and iron, which were slightly higher or below 67% of the Dietary Reference Intakes or other dietary guidelines. Anemia, as assessed by hemoglobin levels, was present throughout the study and did not correlate with iron intake.

CONCLUSION

This culturally sensitive cholesterol reducing diet program was successful in decreasing sodium intake and maintaining adequate intakes of most nutrients except B12, dietary fiber, iron, calcium, and folate. Future intervention studies in patients with SLE need to pay special attention to these nutrients and the presence of anemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas at Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14705221

Citation

Shah, Meena, et al. "Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus On a Culturally Sensitive Cholesterol Lowering Dietary Program." The Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 31, no. 1, 2004, pp. 71-5.
Shah M, Adams-Huet B, Kavanaugh A, et al. Nutrient intake and diet quality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus on a culturally sensitive cholesterol lowering dietary program. J Rheumatol. 2004;31(1):71-5.
Shah, M., Adams-Huet, B., Kavanaugh, A., Coyle, Y., & Lipsky, P. (2004). Nutrient intake and diet quality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus on a culturally sensitive cholesterol lowering dietary program. The Journal of Rheumatology, 31(1), 71-5.
Shah M, et al. Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus On a Culturally Sensitive Cholesterol Lowering Dietary Program. J Rheumatol. 2004;31(1):71-5. PubMed PMID: 14705221.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrient intake and diet quality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus on a culturally sensitive cholesterol lowering dietary program. AU - Shah,Meena, AU - Adams-Huet,Beverley, AU - Kavanaugh,Arthur, AU - Coyle,Yvonne, AU - Lipsky,Peter, PY - 2004/1/6/pubmed PY - 2004/4/28/medline PY - 2004/1/6/entrez SP - 71 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of rheumatology JO - J Rheumatol VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a culturally sensitive cholesterol lowering dietary program on energy, protein, fiber, vitamin and mineral intake, diet quality, and hemoglobin levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Seventeen patients with SLE were randomized to a Step II diet intervention group or a control group for 12 weeks. The diet intervention was made up of weekly group sessions during the first 6 weeks followed by telephone counseling every 2 weeks for the last 6 weeks. Food intake was assessed by 3-day food record at baseline, 6, and 12 weeks. Diet quality was assessed by expressing the nutrients as a percentage of the Dietary Reference Intakes of the US National Academy of Sciences, or as a percentage of the nutrient guidelines by the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. Between- and within-group changes in nutrient intakes were assessed by repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: The changes in nutrient intakes were not significantly different between the groups for any of the nonfat nutrients except vitamin B12 (p = 0.05), which decreased in the diet group and increased in the control group. Within-group analysis showed a significant reduction (p = 0.0003 to 0.02) in the diet group in energy and sodium intake at 6 and 12 weeks and B12 intake at 12 weeks compared to the respective baseline values (28-32%, 37-41%, and 43%, respectively). Sodium intake decreased to 66-71% of the total sodium allowance (< 2400 mg per day) in the diet group. The intervention was successful in maintaining adequate intakes or even increasing intakes of most nutrients except B12, dietary fiber, folate, calcium, and iron, which were slightly higher or below 67% of the Dietary Reference Intakes or other dietary guidelines. Anemia, as assessed by hemoglobin levels, was present throughout the study and did not correlate with iron intake. CONCLUSION: This culturally sensitive cholesterol reducing diet program was successful in decreasing sodium intake and maintaining adequate intakes of most nutrients except B12, dietary fiber, iron, calcium, and folate. Future intervention studies in patients with SLE need to pay special attention to these nutrients and the presence of anemia. SN - 0315-162X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14705221/Nutrient_intake_and_diet_quality_in_patients_with_systemic_lupus_erythematosus_on_a_culturally_sensitive_cholesterol_lowering_dietary_program_ L2 - http://www.jrheum.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=14705221 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -