Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Immune protection factors of chemical sunscreens measured in the local contact hypersensitivity model in humans.
J Invest Dermatol. 2003 Nov; 121(5):1080-7.JI

Abstract

We conducted a randomized trial designed to calculate human in vivo immune protection factors of two sunscreen preparations in a model of ultraviolet-induced local suppression of the induction of contact hypersensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. Seventy-five male subjects were exposed in a multistage study to multiples of their individual minimal erythema dose of solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation with or without protection by an ultraviolet B sunscreen (sun protection factor 5.2) or a broad-spectrum ultraviolet A + B sunscreen (sun protection factor 6.2). After 24 h subjects were sensitized with 50 microL of 0.0625% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on a nonirradiated or ultraviolet-irradiated field on the buttock that was unprotected or protected by sunscreen. Three weeks after sensitization the subjects were challenged with varying concentrations of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on their upper inner arm, and the contact hypersensitivity response was determined at 48 and 72 h based on a semiquantitative clinical score, contact hypersensitivity lesion diameters, and dermal skin edema measurement by 20 MHz ultrasound. The 50% immunosuppressive dose ranged from 0.63 to 0.79 minimal erythema dose, depending on the endpoint parameter. Both sunscreens offered significant immunoprotection (p = 0.014-0.002) and their immune protection factor ranged from 4.5 to 5.8 (ultraviolet B sunscreen) and from 7.7 to 11 (ultraviolet A + B sunscreen). The immune protection factor of the ultraviolet B sunscreen was similar to the sun protection factor (5.2), whereas the sunscreen with broad-spectrum ultraviolet A + B protection exhibited better immunoprotective capacity than predicted from the sun protection factor.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Karl-Franzens-University, Graz, Austria. peter.wolf@kfunigraz.ac.atNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14708610

Citation

Wolf, Peter, et al. "Immune Protection Factors of Chemical Sunscreens Measured in the Local Contact Hypersensitivity Model in Humans." The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 121, no. 5, 2003, pp. 1080-7.
Wolf P, Hoffmann C, Quehenberger F, et al. Immune protection factors of chemical sunscreens measured in the local contact hypersensitivity model in humans. J Invest Dermatol. 2003;121(5):1080-7.
Wolf, P., Hoffmann, C., Quehenberger, F., Grinschgl, S., & Kerl, H. (2003). Immune protection factors of chemical sunscreens measured in the local contact hypersensitivity model in humans. The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 121(5), 1080-7.
Wolf P, et al. Immune Protection Factors of Chemical Sunscreens Measured in the Local Contact Hypersensitivity Model in Humans. J Invest Dermatol. 2003;121(5):1080-7. PubMed PMID: 14708610.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Immune protection factors of chemical sunscreens measured in the local contact hypersensitivity model in humans. AU - Wolf,Peter, AU - Hoffmann,Christine, AU - Quehenberger,Franz, AU - Grinschgl,Stephan, AU - Kerl,Helmut, PY - 2004/1/8/pubmed PY - 2004/1/24/medline PY - 2004/1/8/entrez SP - 1080 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of investigative dermatology JO - J Invest Dermatol VL - 121 IS - 5 N2 - We conducted a randomized trial designed to calculate human in vivo immune protection factors of two sunscreen preparations in a model of ultraviolet-induced local suppression of the induction of contact hypersensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. Seventy-five male subjects were exposed in a multistage study to multiples of their individual minimal erythema dose of solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation with or without protection by an ultraviolet B sunscreen (sun protection factor 5.2) or a broad-spectrum ultraviolet A + B sunscreen (sun protection factor 6.2). After 24 h subjects were sensitized with 50 microL of 0.0625% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on a nonirradiated or ultraviolet-irradiated field on the buttock that was unprotected or protected by sunscreen. Three weeks after sensitization the subjects were challenged with varying concentrations of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on their upper inner arm, and the contact hypersensitivity response was determined at 48 and 72 h based on a semiquantitative clinical score, contact hypersensitivity lesion diameters, and dermal skin edema measurement by 20 MHz ultrasound. The 50% immunosuppressive dose ranged from 0.63 to 0.79 minimal erythema dose, depending on the endpoint parameter. Both sunscreens offered significant immunoprotection (p = 0.014-0.002) and their immune protection factor ranged from 4.5 to 5.8 (ultraviolet B sunscreen) and from 7.7 to 11 (ultraviolet A + B sunscreen). The immune protection factor of the ultraviolet B sunscreen was similar to the sun protection factor (5.2), whereas the sunscreen with broad-spectrum ultraviolet A + B protection exhibited better immunoprotective capacity than predicted from the sun protection factor. SN - 0022-202X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14708610/Immune_protection_factors_of_chemical_sunscreens_measured_in_the_local_contact_hypersensitivity_model_in_humans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-202X(15)30493-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -