Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Developing your leadership pipeline.
Harv Bus Rev. 2003 Dec; 81(12):76-84, 125.HB

Abstract

Why do so many newly minted leaders fail so spectacularly? Part of the problem is that in many companies, succession planning is little more than creating a list of high-potential employees and the slots they might fill. It's a mechanical process that's too narrow and hidebound to uncover and correct skill gaps that can derail promising young executives. And it's completely divorced from organizational efforts to transform managers into leaders. Some companies, however, do succeed in building a steady, reliable pipeline of leadership talent by marrying succession planning with leadership development. Eli Lilly, Dow Chemical, Bank of America, and Sonoco Products have created long-term processes for managing the talent roster throughout their organizations--a process Conger and Fulmer call succession management. Drawing on the experiences of these best-practice organizations, the authors outline five rules for establishing a healthy succession management system: Focus on opportunities for development, identify linchpin positions, make the system transparent, measure progress regularly, and be flexible. In Eli Lilly's "action-learning" program, high-potential employees are given a strategic problem to solve so they can learn something of what it takes to be a general manager. The company--and most other best-practice organizations--also relies on Web-based succession management tools to demystify the succession process, and it makes employees themselves responsible for updating the information in their personnel files. Best-practice organizations also track various metrics that reveal whether the right people are moving into the right jobs at the right time, and they assess the strengths and weaknesses not only of individuals but of the entire group. These companies also expect to be tweaking their systems continually, making them easier to use and more responsive to the needs of the organization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Southern California's Center for Effective Organizations, Los Angeles, California, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14712546

Citation

Conger, Jay A., and Robert M. Fulmer. "Developing Your Leadership Pipeline." Harvard Business Review, vol. 81, no. 12, 2003, pp. 76-84, 125.
Conger JA, Fulmer RM. Developing your leadership pipeline. Harv Bus Rev. 2003;81(12):76-84, 125.
Conger, J. A., & Fulmer, R. M. (2003). Developing your leadership pipeline. Harvard Business Review, 81(12), 76-84, 125.
Conger JA, Fulmer RM. Developing Your Leadership Pipeline. Harv Bus Rev. 2003;81(12):76-84, 125. PubMed PMID: 14712546.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Developing your leadership pipeline. AU - Conger,Jay A, AU - Fulmer,Robert M, PY - 2004/1/10/pubmed PY - 2004/2/3/medline PY - 2004/1/10/entrez SP - 76-84, 125 JF - Harvard business review JO - Harv Bus Rev VL - 81 IS - 12 N2 - Why do so many newly minted leaders fail so spectacularly? Part of the problem is that in many companies, succession planning is little more than creating a list of high-potential employees and the slots they might fill. It's a mechanical process that's too narrow and hidebound to uncover and correct skill gaps that can derail promising young executives. And it's completely divorced from organizational efforts to transform managers into leaders. Some companies, however, do succeed in building a steady, reliable pipeline of leadership talent by marrying succession planning with leadership development. Eli Lilly, Dow Chemical, Bank of America, and Sonoco Products have created long-term processes for managing the talent roster throughout their organizations--a process Conger and Fulmer call succession management. Drawing on the experiences of these best-practice organizations, the authors outline five rules for establishing a healthy succession management system: Focus on opportunities for development, identify linchpin positions, make the system transparent, measure progress regularly, and be flexible. In Eli Lilly's "action-learning" program, high-potential employees are given a strategic problem to solve so they can learn something of what it takes to be a general manager. The company--and most other best-practice organizations--also relies on Web-based succession management tools to demystify the succession process, and it makes employees themselves responsible for updating the information in their personnel files. Best-practice organizations also track various metrics that reveal whether the right people are moving into the right jobs at the right time, and they assess the strengths and weaknesses not only of individuals but of the entire group. These companies also expect to be tweaking their systems continually, making them easier to use and more responsive to the needs of the organization. SN - 0017-8012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14712546/Developing_your_leadership_pipeline_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -