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Cigarette tar yields in relation to mortality from lung cancer in the cancer prevention study II prospective cohort, 1982-8.
BMJ 2004; 328(7431):72BMJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the risk of lung cancer in smokers of medium tar filter cigarettes compared with smokers of low tar and very low tar filter cigarettes.

DESIGN

Analysis of the association between the tar rating of the brand of cigarette smoked in 1982 and mortality from lung cancer over the next six years. Multivariate proportional hazards analyses used to assess hazard ratios, with adjustment for age at enrollment, race, educational level, marital status, blue collar employment, occupational exposure to asbestos, intake of vegetables, citrus fruits, and vitamins, and, in analyses of current and former smokers, for age when they started to smoke and number of cigarettes smoked per day.

SETTING

Cancer prevention study II (CPS-II).

PARTICIPANTS

364 239 men and 576 535 women, aged > or = 30 years, who had either never smoked, were former smokers, or were currently smoking a specific brand of cigarette when they were enrolled in the cancer prevention study.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Death from primary cancer of the lung among participants who had never smoked, former smokers, smokers of very low tar (< or = 7 mg tar/cigarette) filter, low tar (8-14 mg) filter, high tar (> or = 22 mg) non-filter brands and medium tar conventional filter brands (15-21 mg).

RESULTS

Irrespective of the tar level of their current brand, all current smokers had a far greater risk of lung cancer than people who had stopped smoking or had never smoked. Compared with smokers of medium tar (15-21 mg) filter cigarettes, risk was higher among men and women who smoked high tar (> or = 22 mg) non-filter brands (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.20 to 1.73, and 1.64, 1.26 to 2.15, respectively). There was no difference in risk among men who smoked brands rated as very low tar (1.17, 0.95 to 1.45) or low tar (1.02, 0.90 to 1.16) compared with those who smoked medium tar brands. The same was seen for women (0.98, 0.80 to 1.21, and 0.95, 0.82 to 1.11, respectively).

CONCLUSION

The increase in lung cancer risk is similar in people who smoke medium tar cigarettes (15-21 mg), low tar cigarettes (8-14 mg), or very low tar cigarettes (< or = 7 mg). Men and women who smoke non-filtered cigarettes with tar ratings > or = 22 mg have an even higher risk of lung cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. jeharris@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14715602

Citation

Harris, Jeffrey E., et al. "Cigarette Tar Yields in Relation to Mortality From Lung Cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Prospective Cohort, 1982-8." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 328, no. 7431, 2004, p. 72.
Harris JE, Thun MJ, Mondul AM, et al. Cigarette tar yields in relation to mortality from lung cancer in the cancer prevention study II prospective cohort, 1982-8. BMJ. 2004;328(7431):72.
Harris, J. E., Thun, M. J., Mondul, A. M., & Calle, E. E. (2004). Cigarette tar yields in relation to mortality from lung cancer in the cancer prevention study II prospective cohort, 1982-8. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 328(7431), p. 72.
Harris JE, et al. Cigarette Tar Yields in Relation to Mortality From Lung Cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Prospective Cohort, 1982-8. BMJ. 2004 Jan 10;328(7431):72. PubMed PMID: 14715602.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cigarette tar yields in relation to mortality from lung cancer in the cancer prevention study II prospective cohort, 1982-8. AU - Harris,Jeffrey E, AU - Thun,Michael J, AU - Mondul,Alison M, AU - Calle,Eugenia E, PY - 2004/1/13/pubmed PY - 2004/2/21/medline PY - 2004/1/13/entrez SP - 72 EP - 72 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 328 IS - 7431 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of lung cancer in smokers of medium tar filter cigarettes compared with smokers of low tar and very low tar filter cigarettes. DESIGN: Analysis of the association between the tar rating of the brand of cigarette smoked in 1982 and mortality from lung cancer over the next six years. Multivariate proportional hazards analyses used to assess hazard ratios, with adjustment for age at enrollment, race, educational level, marital status, blue collar employment, occupational exposure to asbestos, intake of vegetables, citrus fruits, and vitamins, and, in analyses of current and former smokers, for age when they started to smoke and number of cigarettes smoked per day. SETTING: Cancer prevention study II (CPS-II). PARTICIPANTS: 364 239 men and 576 535 women, aged > or = 30 years, who had either never smoked, were former smokers, or were currently smoking a specific brand of cigarette when they were enrolled in the cancer prevention study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Death from primary cancer of the lung among participants who had never smoked, former smokers, smokers of very low tar (< or = 7 mg tar/cigarette) filter, low tar (8-14 mg) filter, high tar (> or = 22 mg) non-filter brands and medium tar conventional filter brands (15-21 mg). RESULTS: Irrespective of the tar level of their current brand, all current smokers had a far greater risk of lung cancer than people who had stopped smoking or had never smoked. Compared with smokers of medium tar (15-21 mg) filter cigarettes, risk was higher among men and women who smoked high tar (> or = 22 mg) non-filter brands (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.20 to 1.73, and 1.64, 1.26 to 2.15, respectively). There was no difference in risk among men who smoked brands rated as very low tar (1.17, 0.95 to 1.45) or low tar (1.02, 0.90 to 1.16) compared with those who smoked medium tar brands. The same was seen for women (0.98, 0.80 to 1.21, and 0.95, 0.82 to 1.11, respectively). CONCLUSION: The increase in lung cancer risk is similar in people who smoke medium tar cigarettes (15-21 mg), low tar cigarettes (8-14 mg), or very low tar cigarettes (< or = 7 mg). Men and women who smoke non-filtered cigarettes with tar ratings > or = 22 mg have an even higher risk of lung cancer. SN - 1756-1833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14715602/Cigarette_tar_yields_in_relation_to_mortality_from_lung_cancer_in_the_cancer_prevention_study_II_prospective_cohort_1982_8_ L2 - http://www.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=14715602 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -