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Vitamin E and selenium supplementation to alleviate cold-stress-associated deterioration in egg quality and egg yolk mineral concentrations of Japanese quails.
Biol Trace Elem Res. 2003 Winter; 96(1-3):179-89.BT

Abstract

The effects of vitamin E (dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) and selenium (Se; Na2-SeO3) on egg production, egg quality, and mineral content of egg yolk in Japanese quails reared under a low ambient temperature (6 degrees C) were evaluated. Birds (n=300; 7 wk old) were randomly assigned to 12 treatment groups, 25 birds per group. The birds in a 3 x 2 factorial design received either three levels of vitamin E (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg diet) or two levels of selenium (0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg diet). After 2 wk on feed, six groups of the birds were maintained at 18 degrees C (thermoneutral temperature [TN]), and the other half were acclimated over 3 d to a decreased environmental temperature of 6 degrees C (cold stress [CS]). The performance, egg quality, and mineral content of egg yolk were not influenced by supplemental vitamin E and selenium in quails not exposed to cold stress (p > or = 0.09). Two hundred fifty and 500 mg vitamin E/kg diet compared with 125 mg/kg diet and higher dietary selenium inclusions (0.2 vs 0.1 mg/kg) resulted in a better body weight, egg production, and feed efficiency (p = 0.01) in quails reared under CS. Similarly, egg weight, egg specific gravity, eggshell thickness, and Haugh unit were positively influenced with vitamin E (p = 0.01) and selenium (p < or = 0.05) supplementation. Egg yolk concentrations of Zn, Fe, and Mn were higher with higher dietary vitamin E (p = 0.01) and selenium (p = 0.05). There was no interaction detected for parameters measured in the present study (p > or = 0.3). The results of the present study showed that a combination of 250 or 500 mg vitamin E and 0.2 mg selenium per kilogram of diet provides the greatest effects on performance and egg quality of Japanese quails reared under cold stress and suggest that such a supplementation can be considered as a protective management practice in Japanese quail diets to reduce the detrimental effects of cold stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Veterinary Control and Research Institute, 23100 Elazig, Turkey.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14716097

Citation

Sahin, Nurhan, et al. "Vitamin E and Selenium Supplementation to Alleviate Cold-stress-associated Deterioration in Egg Quality and Egg Yolk Mineral Concentrations of Japanese Quails." Biological Trace Element Research, vol. 96, no. 1-3, 2003, pp. 179-89.
Sahin N, Sahin K, Onderci M. Vitamin E and selenium supplementation to alleviate cold-stress-associated deterioration in egg quality and egg yolk mineral concentrations of Japanese quails. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2003;96(1-3):179-89.
Sahin, N., Sahin, K., & Onderci, M. (2003). Vitamin E and selenium supplementation to alleviate cold-stress-associated deterioration in egg quality and egg yolk mineral concentrations of Japanese quails. Biological Trace Element Research, 96(1-3), 179-89.
Sahin N, Sahin K, Onderci M. Vitamin E and Selenium Supplementation to Alleviate Cold-stress-associated Deterioration in Egg Quality and Egg Yolk Mineral Concentrations of Japanese Quails. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2003;96(1-3):179-89. PubMed PMID: 14716097.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin E and selenium supplementation to alleviate cold-stress-associated deterioration in egg quality and egg yolk mineral concentrations of Japanese quails. AU - Sahin,Nurhan, AU - Sahin,Kazim, AU - Onderci,Muhittin, PY - 2003/03/13/received PY - 2003/04/29/accepted PY - 2004/1/13/pubmed PY - 2004/9/15/medline PY - 2004/1/13/entrez SP - 179 EP - 89 JF - Biological trace element research JO - Biol Trace Elem Res VL - 96 IS - 1-3 N2 - The effects of vitamin E (dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) and selenium (Se; Na2-SeO3) on egg production, egg quality, and mineral content of egg yolk in Japanese quails reared under a low ambient temperature (6 degrees C) were evaluated. Birds (n=300; 7 wk old) were randomly assigned to 12 treatment groups, 25 birds per group. The birds in a 3 x 2 factorial design received either three levels of vitamin E (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg diet) or two levels of selenium (0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg diet). After 2 wk on feed, six groups of the birds were maintained at 18 degrees C (thermoneutral temperature [TN]), and the other half were acclimated over 3 d to a decreased environmental temperature of 6 degrees C (cold stress [CS]). The performance, egg quality, and mineral content of egg yolk were not influenced by supplemental vitamin E and selenium in quails not exposed to cold stress (p > or = 0.09). Two hundred fifty and 500 mg vitamin E/kg diet compared with 125 mg/kg diet and higher dietary selenium inclusions (0.2 vs 0.1 mg/kg) resulted in a better body weight, egg production, and feed efficiency (p = 0.01) in quails reared under CS. Similarly, egg weight, egg specific gravity, eggshell thickness, and Haugh unit were positively influenced with vitamin E (p = 0.01) and selenium (p < or = 0.05) supplementation. Egg yolk concentrations of Zn, Fe, and Mn were higher with higher dietary vitamin E (p = 0.01) and selenium (p = 0.05). There was no interaction detected for parameters measured in the present study (p > or = 0.3). The results of the present study showed that a combination of 250 or 500 mg vitamin E and 0.2 mg selenium per kilogram of diet provides the greatest effects on performance and egg quality of Japanese quails reared under cold stress and suggest that such a supplementation can be considered as a protective management practice in Japanese quail diets to reduce the detrimental effects of cold stress. SN - 0163-4984 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14716097/Vitamin_E_and_selenium_supplementation_to_alleviate_cold_stress_associated_deterioration_in_egg_quality_and_egg_yolk_mineral_concentrations_of_Japanese_quails_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1385/BTER:96:1-3:179 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -