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Cigarette smoking and colorectal carcinoma mortality in a cohort with long-term follow-up.
Cancer. 2004 Jan 15; 100(2):288-93.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence suggests that colorectal carcinoma (CRC) may be a tobacco-associated malignancy.

METHODS

In the current study, the authors examined the association between cigarette smoking and CRC mortality in the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry study, a cohort of 39,299 men and women with an average of 26 years of follow-up. To assess whether the association was stronger in participants with a potentially long history of smoking, the authors also stratified the analysis using a baseline age > or = 50 years versus < 50 years.

RESULTS

Using multivariate Cox regression analysis, there was a marginally significant trend (P = 0.06) for men and women combined between smoking and CRC mortality. In the age-stratified analysis in the older participant group, there was no apparent association for men, women, or men and women combined. In the younger participant group, there appeared to be dose-response relations for women and for men and women combined (P value for trend = 0.008 and 0.03, respectively) between smoking and CRC mortality. The relative risk for women who smoked >20 cigarettes/day compared with never smokers was 2.49 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.87-7.12), and was 1.87 for men and women combined (95% CI, 1.08-3.22).

CONCLUSIONS

The results of the current study support an association between cigarette smoking and CRC mortality, particularly in women age < 50 years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 680 North Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1102, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14716762

Citation

Colangelo, Laura A., et al. "Cigarette Smoking and Colorectal Carcinoma Mortality in a Cohort With Long-term Follow-up." Cancer, vol. 100, no. 2, 2004, pp. 288-93.
Colangelo LA, Gapstur SM, Gann PH, et al. Cigarette smoking and colorectal carcinoma mortality in a cohort with long-term follow-up. Cancer. 2004;100(2):288-93.
Colangelo, L. A., Gapstur, S. M., Gann, P. H., & Dyer, A. R. (2004). Cigarette smoking and colorectal carcinoma mortality in a cohort with long-term follow-up. Cancer, 100(2), 288-93.
Colangelo LA, et al. Cigarette Smoking and Colorectal Carcinoma Mortality in a Cohort With Long-term Follow-up. Cancer. 2004 Jan 15;100(2):288-93. PubMed PMID: 14716762.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cigarette smoking and colorectal carcinoma mortality in a cohort with long-term follow-up. AU - Colangelo,Laura A, AU - Gapstur,Susan M, AU - Gann,Peter H, AU - Dyer,Alan R, PY - 2004/1/13/pubmed PY - 2004/1/31/medline PY - 2004/1/13/entrez SP - 288 EP - 93 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 100 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that colorectal carcinoma (CRC) may be a tobacco-associated malignancy. METHODS: In the current study, the authors examined the association between cigarette smoking and CRC mortality in the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry study, a cohort of 39,299 men and women with an average of 26 years of follow-up. To assess whether the association was stronger in participants with a potentially long history of smoking, the authors also stratified the analysis using a baseline age > or = 50 years versus < 50 years. RESULTS: Using multivariate Cox regression analysis, there was a marginally significant trend (P = 0.06) for men and women combined between smoking and CRC mortality. In the age-stratified analysis in the older participant group, there was no apparent association for men, women, or men and women combined. In the younger participant group, there appeared to be dose-response relations for women and for men and women combined (P value for trend = 0.008 and 0.03, respectively) between smoking and CRC mortality. The relative risk for women who smoked >20 cigarettes/day compared with never smokers was 2.49 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.87-7.12), and was 1.87 for men and women combined (95% CI, 1.08-3.22). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study support an association between cigarette smoking and CRC mortality, particularly in women age < 50 years. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14716762/Cigarette_smoking_and_colorectal_carcinoma_mortality_in_a_cohort_with_long_term_follow_up_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11923 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -