Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Racial differences in optic disc topography: baseline results from the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy ancillary study to the ocular hypertension treatment study.
Arch Ophthalmol 2004; 122(1):22-8AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine racial differences in optic disc topography among ocular hypertensive participants in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study.

METHODS

Four hundred thirty-nine participants from 7 Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study centers who had good-quality baseline images obtained using a quantitative 3-dimensional confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope, the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (Heidelberg Engineering, Dossenheim, Germany), were included in this study. The first 10 degrees- or 15 degrees-field of view mean topographic image acquired was included in all analyses. Differences in Heidelberg Retina Tomograph topographic optic disc parameter measurements by self-identified race were assessed using a mixed-effects linear model to control for confounders and for the use of both eyes in the model.

RESULTS

By self-attribution, 74 (17%) of the 439 participants were of African origin, 329 (75%) were white, 24 (5%) were Hispanic, and 12 (3%) were Native American, Native Alaskan, Asian, Pacific Islander, or unknown. The African American participants had statistically significantly (P<.001) larger mean (SD) optic disc areas than the other participants, 2.17 (0.41) mm(2) vs 1.87 (0.38) mm(2), respectively. African American participants had a larger cup area, cup volume, cup depth, neuroretinal rim area, rim volume, and smaller rim-optic disc area ratios than the other participants. No difference between African American and the other participants was found for cup shape and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. After controlling for optic disc area, none of the differences between African American and the other participants found in the univariate analysis remained statistically significant (P>.10).

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrated in a large cohort of subjects with ocular hypertension, that African Americans have significantly larger optic discs, optic cups, neuroretinal rims, and cup-disc ratios than other racial groups. Furthermore, this study found that differences in topographic optic disc parameters between African Americans with ocular hypertension and other racial groups are largely explained by the larger optic disc area in the African Americans. These results highlight the need to consider race and optic disc size when evaluating the appearance of the optic disc in glaucoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla 92093, USA. zangwill@eyecenter.ucsd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14718290

Citation

Zangwill, Linda M., et al. "Racial Differences in Optic Disc Topography: Baseline Results From the Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Ancillary Study to the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study." Archives of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), vol. 122, no. 1, 2004, pp. 22-8.
Zangwill LM, Weinreb RN, Berry CC, et al. Racial differences in optic disc topography: baseline results from the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy ancillary study to the ocular hypertension treatment study. Arch Ophthalmol. 2004;122(1):22-8.
Zangwill, L. M., Weinreb, R. N., Berry, C. C., Smith, A. R., Dirkes, K. A., Coleman, A. L., ... Kass, M. A. (2004). Racial differences in optic disc topography: baseline results from the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy ancillary study to the ocular hypertension treatment study. Archives of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), 122(1), pp. 22-8.
Zangwill LM, et al. Racial Differences in Optic Disc Topography: Baseline Results From the Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Ancillary Study to the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study. Arch Ophthalmol. 2004;122(1):22-8. PubMed PMID: 14718290.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial differences in optic disc topography: baseline results from the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy ancillary study to the ocular hypertension treatment study. AU - Zangwill,Linda M, AU - Weinreb,Robert N, AU - Berry,Charles C, AU - Smith,Amanda R, AU - Dirkes,Keri A, AU - Coleman,Anne L, AU - Piltz-Seymour,Jody R, AU - Liebmann,Jeffrey M, AU - Cioffi,George A, AU - Trick,Gary, AU - Brandt,James D, AU - Gordon,Mae O, AU - Kass,Michael A, AU - ,, PY - 2004/1/14/pubmed PY - 2004/1/24/medline PY - 2004/1/14/entrez SP - 22 EP - 8 JF - Archives of ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960) JO - Arch. Ophthalmol. VL - 122 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine racial differences in optic disc topography among ocular hypertensive participants in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study. METHODS: Four hundred thirty-nine participants from 7 Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study centers who had good-quality baseline images obtained using a quantitative 3-dimensional confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope, the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (Heidelberg Engineering, Dossenheim, Germany), were included in this study. The first 10 degrees- or 15 degrees-field of view mean topographic image acquired was included in all analyses. Differences in Heidelberg Retina Tomograph topographic optic disc parameter measurements by self-identified race were assessed using a mixed-effects linear model to control for confounders and for the use of both eyes in the model. RESULTS: By self-attribution, 74 (17%) of the 439 participants were of African origin, 329 (75%) were white, 24 (5%) were Hispanic, and 12 (3%) were Native American, Native Alaskan, Asian, Pacific Islander, or unknown. The African American participants had statistically significantly (P<.001) larger mean (SD) optic disc areas than the other participants, 2.17 (0.41) mm(2) vs 1.87 (0.38) mm(2), respectively. African American participants had a larger cup area, cup volume, cup depth, neuroretinal rim area, rim volume, and smaller rim-optic disc area ratios than the other participants. No difference between African American and the other participants was found for cup shape and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. After controlling for optic disc area, none of the differences between African American and the other participants found in the univariate analysis remained statistically significant (P>.10). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated in a large cohort of subjects with ocular hypertension, that African Americans have significantly larger optic discs, optic cups, neuroretinal rims, and cup-disc ratios than other racial groups. Furthermore, this study found that differences in topographic optic disc parameters between African Americans with ocular hypertension and other racial groups are largely explained by the larger optic disc area in the African Americans. These results highlight the need to consider race and optic disc size when evaluating the appearance of the optic disc in glaucoma. SN - 0003-9950 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14718290/Racial_differences_in_optic_disc_topography:_baseline_results_from_the_confocal_scanning_laser_ophthalmoscopy_ancillary_study_to_the_ocular_hypertension_treatment_study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/10.1001/archopht.122.1.22 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -