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The agreement between measured and predicted resting energy expenditure in patients with pancreatic cancer: a pilot study.
JOP 2004; 5(1):32-40JOP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare measured resting energy expenditure to resting energy expenditure predicted from eight published prediction equations in a sample of patients with pancreatic cancer.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Ambulatory patients of a tertiary private hospital.

PARTICIPANTS

Eight patients with pancreatic cancer (5 males, 3 females; age: 62.0+/- 5.2 years; BMI: 24.4+/- 3.2 kg/m2; weight loss: 12.1+/- 6.0%; mean+/- SD).

METHODS

Resting energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry and predicted from eight published prediction methods (Harris-Benedict with no injury factor, Harris-Benedict with 1.3 injury factor, Schofield, Owen, Mifflin, Cunningham, and Wang equations and the 20 kcal/kg ratio). Body composition was assessed by deuterium oxide dilution technique. Statistical analysis was performed by using the method of Bland and Altman, and the Student's t-test.

RESULTS

The Harris-Benedict equations with an injury factor of 1.3 resulted in a significantly higher mean predicted resting energy expenditure compared to measured resting energy expenditure, while there was no significant difference between mean measured and predicted resting energy expenditure and the other 7 methods. At an individual level, the limits of agreement are wide for all equations. The best combination of low bias and narrowest limits of agreement was observed in the prediction of resting energy expenditure from the Wang equation (based on fat free mass) and the Harris-Benedict equation (based on weight and height).

CONCLUSION

At a group level, there is agreement between mean measured and predicted resting energy expenditure with the exception of the Harris-Benedict equation with an injury factor of 1.3. The results of this pilot study suggest that, for an individual, the limits of agreement are wide, and clinically important differences in resting energy expenditure would be obtained. Clinicians need to be aware of the limitations of the use of resting energy expenditure prediction equations for individuals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Wesley Research Institute, Toowong, Brisbane, Australia. judithba@wesley.com.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14730120

Citation

Bauer, Judith, et al. "The Agreement Between Measured and Predicted Resting Energy Expenditure in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer: a Pilot Study." JOP : Journal of the Pancreas, vol. 5, no. 1, 2004, pp. 32-40.
Bauer J, Reeves MM, Capra S. The agreement between measured and predicted resting energy expenditure in patients with pancreatic cancer: a pilot study. JOP. 2004;5(1):32-40.
Bauer, J., Reeves, M. M., & Capra, S. (2004). The agreement between measured and predicted resting energy expenditure in patients with pancreatic cancer: a pilot study. JOP : Journal of the Pancreas, 5(1), pp. 32-40.
Bauer J, Reeves MM, Capra S. The Agreement Between Measured and Predicted Resting Energy Expenditure in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer: a Pilot Study. JOP. 2004;5(1):32-40. PubMed PMID: 14730120.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The agreement between measured and predicted resting energy expenditure in patients with pancreatic cancer: a pilot study. AU - Bauer,Judith, AU - Reeves,Marina M, AU - Capra,Sandra, PY - 2004/1/20/pubmed PY - 2004/3/6/medline PY - 2004/1/20/entrez SP - 32 EP - 40 JF - JOP : Journal of the pancreas JO - JOP VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare measured resting energy expenditure to resting energy expenditure predicted from eight published prediction equations in a sample of patients with pancreatic cancer. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Ambulatory patients of a tertiary private hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Eight patients with pancreatic cancer (5 males, 3 females; age: 62.0+/- 5.2 years; BMI: 24.4+/- 3.2 kg/m2; weight loss: 12.1+/- 6.0%; mean+/- SD). METHODS: Resting energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry and predicted from eight published prediction methods (Harris-Benedict with no injury factor, Harris-Benedict with 1.3 injury factor, Schofield, Owen, Mifflin, Cunningham, and Wang equations and the 20 kcal/kg ratio). Body composition was assessed by deuterium oxide dilution technique. Statistical analysis was performed by using the method of Bland and Altman, and the Student's t-test. RESULTS: The Harris-Benedict equations with an injury factor of 1.3 resulted in a significantly higher mean predicted resting energy expenditure compared to measured resting energy expenditure, while there was no significant difference between mean measured and predicted resting energy expenditure and the other 7 methods. At an individual level, the limits of agreement are wide for all equations. The best combination of low bias and narrowest limits of agreement was observed in the prediction of resting energy expenditure from the Wang equation (based on fat free mass) and the Harris-Benedict equation (based on weight and height). CONCLUSION: At a group level, there is agreement between mean measured and predicted resting energy expenditure with the exception of the Harris-Benedict equation with an injury factor of 1.3. The results of this pilot study suggest that, for an individual, the limits of agreement are wide, and clinically important differences in resting energy expenditure would be obtained. Clinicians need to be aware of the limitations of the use of resting energy expenditure prediction equations for individuals. SN - 1590-8577 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14730120/The_agreement_between_measured_and_predicted_resting_energy_expenditure_in_patients_with_pancreatic_cancer:_a_pilot_study_ L2 - http://www.joplink.net/prev/200401/04.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -