Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The detection of monkeypox in humans in the Western Hemisphere.
N Engl J Med. 2004 Jan 22; 350(4):342-50.NEJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

During May and June 2003, an outbreak of febrile illness with vesiculopustular eruptions occurred among persons in the midwestern United States who had had contact with ill pet prairie dogs obtained through a common distributor. Zoonotic transmission of a bacterial or viral pathogen was suspected.

METHODS

We reviewed medical records, conducted interviews and examinations, and collected blood and tissue samples for analysis from 11 patients and one prairie dog. Histopathological and electron-microscopical examinations, microbiologic cultures, and molecular assays were performed to identify the etiologic agent.

RESULTS

The initial Wisconsin cases evaluated in this outbreak occurred in five males and six females ranging in age from 3 to 43 years. All patients reported having direct contact with ill prairie dogs before experiencing a febrile illness with skin eruptions. We found immunohistochemical or ultrastructural evidence of poxvirus infection in skin-lesion tissue from four patients. Monkeypox virus was recovered in cell cultures of seven samples from patients and from the prairie dog. The virus was identified by detection of monkeypox-specific DNA sequences in tissues or isolates from six patients and the prairie dog. Epidemiologic investigation suggested that the prairie dogs had been exposed to at least one species of rodent recently imported into the United States from West Africa.

CONCLUSIONS

Our investigation documents the isolation and identification of monkeypox virus from humans in the Western Hemisphere. Infection of humans was associated with direct contact with ill prairie dogs that were being kept or sold as pets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisc, USA. reed.kurt@mcrf.mfldclin.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14736926

Citation

Reed, Kurt D., et al. "The Detection of Monkeypox in Humans in the Western Hemisphere." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 350, no. 4, 2004, pp. 342-50.
Reed KD, Melski JW, Graham MB, et al. The detection of monkeypox in humans in the Western Hemisphere. N Engl J Med. 2004;350(4):342-50.
Reed, K. D., Melski, J. W., Graham, M. B., Regnery, R. L., Sotir, M. J., Wegner, M. V., Kazmierczak, J. J., Stratman, E. J., Li, Y., Fairley, J. A., Swain, G. R., Olson, V. A., Sargent, E. K., Kehl, S. C., Frace, M. A., Kline, R., Foldy, S. L., Davis, J. P., & Damon, I. K. (2004). The detection of monkeypox in humans in the Western Hemisphere. The New England Journal of Medicine, 350(4), 342-50.
Reed KD, et al. The Detection of Monkeypox in Humans in the Western Hemisphere. N Engl J Med. 2004 Jan 22;350(4):342-50. PubMed PMID: 14736926.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The detection of monkeypox in humans in the Western Hemisphere. AU - Reed,Kurt D, AU - Melski,John W, AU - Graham,Mary Beth, AU - Regnery,Russell L, AU - Sotir,Mark J, AU - Wegner,Mark V, AU - Kazmierczak,James J, AU - Stratman,Erik J, AU - Li,Yu, AU - Fairley,Janet A, AU - Swain,Geoffrey R, AU - Olson,Victoria A, AU - Sargent,Elizabeth K, AU - Kehl,Sue C, AU - Frace,Michael A, AU - Kline,Richard, AU - Foldy,Seth L, AU - Davis,Jeffrey P, AU - Damon,Inger K, PY - 2004/1/23/pubmed PY - 2004/1/30/medline PY - 2004/1/23/entrez SP - 342 EP - 50 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N Engl J Med VL - 350 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: During May and June 2003, an outbreak of febrile illness with vesiculopustular eruptions occurred among persons in the midwestern United States who had had contact with ill pet prairie dogs obtained through a common distributor. Zoonotic transmission of a bacterial or viral pathogen was suspected. METHODS: We reviewed medical records, conducted interviews and examinations, and collected blood and tissue samples for analysis from 11 patients and one prairie dog. Histopathological and electron-microscopical examinations, microbiologic cultures, and molecular assays were performed to identify the etiologic agent. RESULTS: The initial Wisconsin cases evaluated in this outbreak occurred in five males and six females ranging in age from 3 to 43 years. All patients reported having direct contact with ill prairie dogs before experiencing a febrile illness with skin eruptions. We found immunohistochemical or ultrastructural evidence of poxvirus infection in skin-lesion tissue from four patients. Monkeypox virus was recovered in cell cultures of seven samples from patients and from the prairie dog. The virus was identified by detection of monkeypox-specific DNA sequences in tissues or isolates from six patients and the prairie dog. Epidemiologic investigation suggested that the prairie dogs had been exposed to at least one species of rodent recently imported into the United States from West Africa. CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation documents the isolation and identification of monkeypox virus from humans in the Western Hemisphere. Infection of humans was associated with direct contact with ill prairie dogs that were being kept or sold as pets. SN - 1533-4406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14736926/The_detection_of_monkeypox_in_humans_in_the_Western_Hemisphere_ L2 - https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa032299?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -