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Intestinal parasites among African refugees resettled in Massachusetts and the impact of an overseas pre-departure treatment program.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2003 Dec; 69(6):657-62.AJ

Abstract

This study analyzed the prevalence of intestinal parasitoses diagnosed shortly after arrival in the United States among African refugees before and after implementation of an overseas program of empirical treatment with albendazole. Variables included results of microscopy of a single stool specimen, age, sex, ethnicity, departure origin, and receipt of albendazole. Of 1,254 refugees, 56% had intestinal parasites. Fourteen percent had helminths, and 2% had multiple helminths. In addition, 52% had protozoans with 25% having multiple protozoans. The most common pathogens were Giardia lamblia (14%) and Trichuris trichiura (9%). Overall, refugees who arrived in Massachusetts after implementation of the treatment program were less likely to have any parasites (odds ratio [OR] = 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47-0.78) and helminths (OR = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.09-0.24) than refugees who arrived previously. These more recently arrived refugees were also less likely to have hookworm (OR = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.00-0.29), Trichuris (OR = 0.05, 95% CI = 0.02-0.13), Ascaris (OR = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.01-0.58), and Entamoeba histolytica (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.26-0.86). Empirically treating refugees prior to departure for the United States appears to have resulted in decreases in intestinal helminths and possibly some protozoans among African refugees tested shortly after arrival in this country.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Refugee and Immigrant Health Program, Bureau of Communicable Disease Control, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 02130, USA. paul.geltman@state.ma.usNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14740885

Citation

Geltman, Paul L., et al. "Intestinal Parasites Among African Refugees Resettled in Massachusetts and the Impact of an Overseas Pre-departure Treatment Program." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 69, no. 6, 2003, pp. 657-62.
Geltman PL, Cochran J, Hedgecock C. Intestinal parasites among African refugees resettled in Massachusetts and the impact of an overseas pre-departure treatment program. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2003;69(6):657-62.
Geltman, P. L., Cochran, J., & Hedgecock, C. (2003). Intestinal parasites among African refugees resettled in Massachusetts and the impact of an overseas pre-departure treatment program. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 69(6), 657-62.
Geltman PL, Cochran J, Hedgecock C. Intestinal Parasites Among African Refugees Resettled in Massachusetts and the Impact of an Overseas Pre-departure Treatment Program. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2003;69(6):657-62. PubMed PMID: 14740885.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intestinal parasites among African refugees resettled in Massachusetts and the impact of an overseas pre-departure treatment program. AU - Geltman,Paul L, AU - Cochran,Jennifer, AU - Hedgecock,Cressida, PY - 2004/1/27/pubmed PY - 2004/2/10/medline PY - 2004/1/27/entrez SP - 657 EP - 62 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 69 IS - 6 N2 - This study analyzed the prevalence of intestinal parasitoses diagnosed shortly after arrival in the United States among African refugees before and after implementation of an overseas program of empirical treatment with albendazole. Variables included results of microscopy of a single stool specimen, age, sex, ethnicity, departure origin, and receipt of albendazole. Of 1,254 refugees, 56% had intestinal parasites. Fourteen percent had helminths, and 2% had multiple helminths. In addition, 52% had protozoans with 25% having multiple protozoans. The most common pathogens were Giardia lamblia (14%) and Trichuris trichiura (9%). Overall, refugees who arrived in Massachusetts after implementation of the treatment program were less likely to have any parasites (odds ratio [OR] = 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47-0.78) and helminths (OR = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.09-0.24) than refugees who arrived previously. These more recently arrived refugees were also less likely to have hookworm (OR = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.00-0.29), Trichuris (OR = 0.05, 95% CI = 0.02-0.13), Ascaris (OR = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.01-0.58), and Entamoeba histolytica (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.26-0.86). Empirically treating refugees prior to departure for the United States appears to have resulted in decreases in intestinal helminths and possibly some protozoans among African refugees tested shortly after arrival in this country. SN - 0002-9637 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14740885/Intestinal_parasites_among_African_refugees_resettled_in_Massachusetts_and_the_impact_of_an_overseas_pre_departure_treatment_program_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -