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Beta-adrenergic blockers reduce the risk of fracture partly by increasing bone mineral density: Geelong Osteoporosis Study.
J Bone Miner Res 2004; 19(1):19-24JB

Abstract

This population-based study documented beta-blocker use in 59/569 cases with incident fracture and 112/775 controls. OR for fracture associated with beta-blocker use was 0.68 (95%CI, 0.49-0.96). Beta-blockers were associated with higher BMD at the total hip (2.5%) and UD forearm (3.6%) after adjusting for age, anthropometry, and thiazide use. Beta-blocker use is associated with reduced fracture risk and higher BMD.

INTRODUCTION

Animal data suggests that bone formation is under beta-adrenergic control and that beta-blockers stimulate bone formation and/or inhibit bone resorption.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We evaluated the association between beta-blocker use, bone mineral density (BMD), and fracture risk in a population-based study in Geelong, a southeastern Australian city with a single teaching hospital and two radiological centers providing complete fracture ascertainment for the region. Beta-blocker use was documented for 569 women with radiologically confirmed incident fractures and 775 controls without incident fracture. Medication use and lifestyle factors were documented by questionnaire.

RESULTS

Odds ratio for fracture associated with beta-blocker use was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.49-0.96) for any fracture. Adjusting for age, weight, medications, and lifestyle factors had little effect on the odds ratio. Beta-blocker use was associated with a higher BMD at the total hip (2.5%, p = 0.03) and ultradistal forearm (3.6%, p = 0.04) after adjustment for age, anthropometry, and thiazide use.

CONCLUSION

Beta-blockers are associated with a reduction in fracture risk and higher BMD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia. juliep@barwonhealth.org.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14753732

Citation

Pasco, Julie A., et al. "Beta-adrenergic Blockers Reduce the Risk of Fracture Partly By Increasing Bone Mineral Density: Geelong Osteoporosis Study." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 19, no. 1, 2004, pp. 19-24.
Pasco JA, Henry MJ, Sanders KM, et al. Beta-adrenergic blockers reduce the risk of fracture partly by increasing bone mineral density: Geelong Osteoporosis Study. J Bone Miner Res. 2004;19(1):19-24.
Pasco, J. A., Henry, M. J., Sanders, K. M., Kotowicz, M. A., Seeman, E., & Nicholson, G. C. (2004). Beta-adrenergic blockers reduce the risk of fracture partly by increasing bone mineral density: Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 19(1), pp. 19-24.
Pasco JA, et al. Beta-adrenergic Blockers Reduce the Risk of Fracture Partly By Increasing Bone Mineral Density: Geelong Osteoporosis Study. J Bone Miner Res. 2004;19(1):19-24. PubMed PMID: 14753732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beta-adrenergic blockers reduce the risk of fracture partly by increasing bone mineral density: Geelong Osteoporosis Study. AU - Pasco,Julie A, AU - Henry,Margaret J, AU - Sanders,Kerrie M, AU - Kotowicz,Mark A, AU - Seeman,Ego, AU - Nicholson,Geoffrey C, AU - ,, PY - 2004/2/3/pubmed PY - 2004/10/7/medline PY - 2004/2/3/entrez SP - 19 EP - 24 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - UNLABELLED: This population-based study documented beta-blocker use in 59/569 cases with incident fracture and 112/775 controls. OR for fracture associated with beta-blocker use was 0.68 (95%CI, 0.49-0.96). Beta-blockers were associated with higher BMD at the total hip (2.5%) and UD forearm (3.6%) after adjusting for age, anthropometry, and thiazide use. Beta-blocker use is associated with reduced fracture risk and higher BMD. INTRODUCTION: Animal data suggests that bone formation is under beta-adrenergic control and that beta-blockers stimulate bone formation and/or inhibit bone resorption. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated the association between beta-blocker use, bone mineral density (BMD), and fracture risk in a population-based study in Geelong, a southeastern Australian city with a single teaching hospital and two radiological centers providing complete fracture ascertainment for the region. Beta-blocker use was documented for 569 women with radiologically confirmed incident fractures and 775 controls without incident fracture. Medication use and lifestyle factors were documented by questionnaire. RESULTS: Odds ratio for fracture associated with beta-blocker use was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.49-0.96) for any fracture. Adjusting for age, weight, medications, and lifestyle factors had little effect on the odds ratio. Beta-blocker use was associated with a higher BMD at the total hip (2.5%, p = 0.03) and ultradistal forearm (3.6%, p = 0.04) after adjustment for age, anthropometry, and thiazide use. CONCLUSION: Beta-blockers are associated with a reduction in fracture risk and higher BMD. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14753732/Beta_adrenergic_blockers_reduce_the_risk_of_fracture_partly_by_increasing_bone_mineral_density:_Geelong_Osteoporosis_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.0301214 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -