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Cold shock response of yeast cells: induction of a 33 kDa protein and protection against freezing injury.
Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 1992 Aug-Sep; 38(5-6):553-9.CM

Abstract

Cold shock (10 degrees C) treatment to Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells normally grown at 30 degrees C resulted in splitting of vacuoles and retarded membrane fluidity as detected by phase contrast microscopy and in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, respectively. The treatment was found to impart protection against subsequent freezing as studied by cell viability and colony forming efficiency. We have earlier reported similar protection and retarded membrane fluidity as a result of heat shock treatment to these cells (Obuchi et al., 1990). This suggests that cold shock and heat shock treatments to yeast cells evoke some analogous responses. However, biochemically a new 33 kDa protein (CSP 33) was detected upon cold shock treatment which is distinct from heat shock induced family of proteins (Kaul et al., 1992). We present here the first report of this kind and its practical implications for protection against freezing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fermentation Research Institute, Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1483108

Citation

Kaul, S C., et al. "Cold Shock Response of Yeast Cells: Induction of a 33 kDa Protein and Protection Against Freezing Injury." Cellular and Molecular Biology (Noisy-le-Grand, France), vol. 38, no. 5-6, 1992, pp. 553-9.
Kaul SC, Obuchi K, Komatsu Y. Cold shock response of yeast cells: induction of a 33 kDa protein and protection against freezing injury. Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 1992;38(5-6):553-9.
Kaul, S. C., Obuchi, K., & Komatsu, Y. (1992). Cold shock response of yeast cells: induction of a 33 kDa protein and protection against freezing injury. Cellular and Molecular Biology (Noisy-le-Grand, France), 38(5-6), 553-9.
Kaul SC, Obuchi K, Komatsu Y. Cold Shock Response of Yeast Cells: Induction of a 33 kDa Protein and Protection Against Freezing Injury. Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 1992 Aug-Sep;38(5-6):553-9. PubMed PMID: 1483108.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cold shock response of yeast cells: induction of a 33 kDa protein and protection against freezing injury. AU - Kaul,S C, AU - Obuchi,K, AU - Komatsu,Y, PY - 1992/8/1/pubmed PY - 1992/8/1/medline PY - 1992/8/1/entrez SP - 553 EP - 9 JF - Cellular and molecular biology (Noisy-le-Grand, France) JO - Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand) VL - 38 IS - 5-6 N2 - Cold shock (10 degrees C) treatment to Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells normally grown at 30 degrees C resulted in splitting of vacuoles and retarded membrane fluidity as detected by phase contrast microscopy and in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, respectively. The treatment was found to impart protection against subsequent freezing as studied by cell viability and colony forming efficiency. We have earlier reported similar protection and retarded membrane fluidity as a result of heat shock treatment to these cells (Obuchi et al., 1990). This suggests that cold shock and heat shock treatments to yeast cells evoke some analogous responses. However, biochemically a new 33 kDa protein (CSP 33) was detected upon cold shock treatment which is distinct from heat shock induced family of proteins (Kaul et al., 1992). We present here the first report of this kind and its practical implications for protection against freezing. SN - 0145-5680 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1483108/Cold_shock_response_of_yeast_cells:_induction_of_a_33_kDa_protein_and_protection_against_freezing_injury_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -