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Evaluating a statewide home visiting program to prevent child abuse in at-risk families of newborns: fathers' participation and outcomes.
Child Maltreat. 2004 Feb; 9(1):3-17.CM

Abstract

This study sought to describe fathers' participation in a statewide home-visiting program to prevent child abuse and to assess program impact on their parenting. This randomized trial followed 643 at-risk families for 3 years. Data were collected through program record review, staff surveys, and annual maternal interviews. Participation in visits varied by the parents' relationship and paternal employment, violence, and heavy drinking at baseline. Overall, the program had no apparent impact on fathers' accessibility to the child, engagement in parenting activities, and sharing of responsibility for the child's welfare. The program promoted parenting involvement for nonviolent fathers in couples who lived together but also for violent fathers in couples with little contact at baseline; it decreased the father's accessibility to the child in couples who lived apart but saw each other frequently at baseline. Infrequent participation in visits and differential program impact on violent versus nonviolent fathers demonstrate the need to consider family context in developing, implementing, and studying home-visiting models.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205-1903, USA. aduggan@jhmi.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14870994

Citation

Duggan, Anne, et al. "Evaluating a Statewide Home Visiting Program to Prevent Child Abuse in At-risk Families of Newborns: Fathers' Participation and Outcomes." Child Maltreatment, vol. 9, no. 1, 2004, pp. 3-17.
Duggan A, Fuddy L, McFarlane E, et al. Evaluating a statewide home visiting program to prevent child abuse in at-risk families of newborns: fathers' participation and outcomes. Child Maltreat. 2004;9(1):3-17.
Duggan, A., Fuddy, L., McFarlane, E., Burrell, L., Windham, A., Higman, S., & Sia, C. (2004). Evaluating a statewide home visiting program to prevent child abuse in at-risk families of newborns: fathers' participation and outcomes. Child Maltreatment, 9(1), 3-17.
Duggan A, et al. Evaluating a Statewide Home Visiting Program to Prevent Child Abuse in At-risk Families of Newborns: Fathers' Participation and Outcomes. Child Maltreat. 2004;9(1):3-17. PubMed PMID: 14870994.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating a statewide home visiting program to prevent child abuse in at-risk families of newborns: fathers' participation and outcomes. AU - Duggan,Anne, AU - Fuddy,Loretta, AU - McFarlane,Elizabeth, AU - Burrell,Lori, AU - Windham,Amy, AU - Higman,Susan, AU - Sia,Calvin, PY - 2004/2/12/pubmed PY - 2004/5/12/medline PY - 2004/2/12/entrez SP - 3 EP - 17 JF - Child maltreatment JO - Child Maltreat VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - This study sought to describe fathers' participation in a statewide home-visiting program to prevent child abuse and to assess program impact on their parenting. This randomized trial followed 643 at-risk families for 3 years. Data were collected through program record review, staff surveys, and annual maternal interviews. Participation in visits varied by the parents' relationship and paternal employment, violence, and heavy drinking at baseline. Overall, the program had no apparent impact on fathers' accessibility to the child, engagement in parenting activities, and sharing of responsibility for the child's welfare. The program promoted parenting involvement for nonviolent fathers in couples who lived together but also for violent fathers in couples with little contact at baseline; it decreased the father's accessibility to the child in couples who lived apart but saw each other frequently at baseline. Infrequent participation in visits and differential program impact on violent versus nonviolent fathers demonstrate the need to consider family context in developing, implementing, and studying home-visiting models. SN - 1077-5595 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14870994/Evaluating_a_statewide_home_visiting_program_to_prevent_child_abuse_in_at_risk_families_of_newborns:_fathers'_participation_and_outcomes_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -