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A home-based two-year strength training period in early rheumatoid arthritis led to good long-term compliance: a five-year followup.
Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Feb 15; 51(1):56-62.AR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the impact of a 2-year home-based strength-training program on physical function in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after a subsequent 3-year followup.

METHODS

Seventy patients with early RA were randomized to perform either strength training (experimental group [EG]) or range-of-motion exercises (control group [CG]). Maximal strength values were recorded by dynamometers. The Modified Disease Activity Score (DAS28), pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), walking speed, and stair-climbing speed were also measured.

RESULTS

The maximum strength of assessed muscle groups increased by 19-59% in the EG during the training period and remained at the reached level throughout the subsequent 3 years. Muscle strength improved in the CG by 1-31%, but less compared with the EG. During the 2-year training period, DAS28 decreased by 50% and 45% and pain by 67% and 39% in the EG and CG, respectively. The differences in muscle strength, DAS28, and HAQ were significantly in favor of the EG both at the 2-year and 5-year followup assessments.

CONCLUSIONS

The improvements achieved during the 2-year strength-training period were sustained for 3 years in patients with early RA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Central Finland Health Care District, Jyväskylä, Finland. arja.hakkinen@ksshp.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14872456

Citation

Häkkinen, Arja, et al. "A Home-based Two-year Strength Training Period in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Led to Good Long-term Compliance: a Five-year Followup." Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 51, no. 1, 2004, pp. 56-62.
Häkkinen A, Sokka T, Hannonen P. A home-based two-year strength training period in early rheumatoid arthritis led to good long-term compliance: a five-year followup. Arthritis Rheum. 2004;51(1):56-62.
Häkkinen, A., Sokka, T., & Hannonen, P. (2004). A home-based two-year strength training period in early rheumatoid arthritis led to good long-term compliance: a five-year followup. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 51(1), 56-62.
Häkkinen A, Sokka T, Hannonen P. A Home-based Two-year Strength Training Period in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Led to Good Long-term Compliance: a Five-year Followup. Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Feb 15;51(1):56-62. PubMed PMID: 14872456.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A home-based two-year strength training period in early rheumatoid arthritis led to good long-term compliance: a five-year followup. AU - Häkkinen,Arja, AU - Sokka,Tuulikki, AU - Hannonen,Pekka, PY - 2004/2/12/pubmed PY - 2004/3/10/medline PY - 2004/2/12/entrez SP - 56 EP - 62 JF - Arthritis and rheumatism JO - Arthritis Rheum VL - 51 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a 2-year home-based strength-training program on physical function in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after a subsequent 3-year followup. METHODS: Seventy patients with early RA were randomized to perform either strength training (experimental group [EG]) or range-of-motion exercises (control group [CG]). Maximal strength values were recorded by dynamometers. The Modified Disease Activity Score (DAS28), pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), walking speed, and stair-climbing speed were also measured. RESULTS: The maximum strength of assessed muscle groups increased by 19-59% in the EG during the training period and remained at the reached level throughout the subsequent 3 years. Muscle strength improved in the CG by 1-31%, but less compared with the EG. During the 2-year training period, DAS28 decreased by 50% and 45% and pain by 67% and 39% in the EG and CG, respectively. The differences in muscle strength, DAS28, and HAQ were significantly in favor of the EG both at the 2-year and 5-year followup assessments. CONCLUSIONS: The improvements achieved during the 2-year strength-training period were sustained for 3 years in patients with early RA. SN - 0004-3591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14872456/A_home_based_two_year_strength_training_period_in_early_rheumatoid_arthritis_led_to_good_long_term_compliance:_a_five_year_followup_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/art.20088 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -