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Secondary and tertiary transfer of vaccinia virus among U.S. military personnel--United States and worldwide, 2002-2004.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2004 Feb 13; 53(5):103-5.MM

Abstract

In December 2002, the Department of Defense (DoD) began vaccinating military personnel as part of the pre-event vaccination program. Because vaccinia virus is present on the skin at the site of vaccination, it can spread to other parts of the body (i.e., autoinoculation) or to contacts of vaccinees (i.e., contact transfer). To prevent autoinoculation and contact transfer, DoD gave vaccinees printed information that focused on hand washing, covering the vaccination site, and limiting contact with infants (1,2). This report describes cases of contact transfer of vaccinia virus among vaccinated military personnel since December 2002; findings indicate that contact transfer of vaccinia virus is rare. Continued efforts are needed to educate vaccinees about the importance of proper vaccination-site care in preventing contact transmission, especially in household settings.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14961003

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Secondary and Tertiary Transfer of Vaccinia Virus Among U.S. Military personnel--United States and Worldwide, 2002-2004." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 53, no. 5, 2004, pp. 103-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Secondary and tertiary transfer of vaccinia virus among U.S. military personnel--United States and worldwide, 2002-2004. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2004;53(5):103-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2004). Secondary and tertiary transfer of vaccinia virus among U.S. military personnel--United States and worldwide, 2002-2004. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 53(5), 103-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Secondary and Tertiary Transfer of Vaccinia Virus Among U.S. Military personnel--United States and Worldwide, 2002-2004. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2004 Feb 13;53(5):103-5. PubMed PMID: 14961003.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Secondary and tertiary transfer of vaccinia virus among U.S. military personnel--United States and worldwide, 2002-2004. A1 - ,, PY - 2004/2/13/pubmed PY - 2004/2/19/medline PY - 2004/2/13/entrez SP - 103 EP - 5 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 53 IS - 5 N2 - In December 2002, the Department of Defense (DoD) began vaccinating military personnel as part of the pre-event vaccination program. Because vaccinia virus is present on the skin at the site of vaccination, it can spread to other parts of the body (i.e., autoinoculation) or to contacts of vaccinees (i.e., contact transfer). To prevent autoinoculation and contact transfer, DoD gave vaccinees printed information that focused on hand washing, covering the vaccination site, and limiting contact with infants (1,2). This report describes cases of contact transfer of vaccinia virus among vaccinated military personnel since December 2002; findings indicate that contact transfer of vaccinia virus is rare. Continued efforts are needed to educate vaccinees about the importance of proper vaccination-site care in preventing contact transmission, especially in household settings. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14961003/Secondary_and_tertiary_transfer_of_vaccinia_virus_among_U_S__military_personnel__United_States_and_worldwide_2002_2004_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5305a3.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -