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UME-21 and teaching ethics: a step in the right direction.
Fam Med. 2004 Jan; 36 Suppl:S36-42.FM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Ethics education for medical students has included a number of relatively vague descriptions of appropriate curricular objectives, but medical schools struggle with the general teaching of ethics, as well as with presenting the ethical dilemmas posed by managed care. This paper proposes some standards and uses them to analyze the general and managed care ethics content of the Undergraduate Medical Education for the 21st Century (UME-21) curricula.

METHODS

We analyzed progress and final reports from each school to define their learning objectives, content, teaching methods, and evaluation strategies in ethics. Each was evaluated using principles of adult learning and Rest's Four Component Model of Moral Development. Good examples of curricular elements from participating schools are described.

RESULTS

Ethics curricula varied widely among the schools. Goals and objectives were often stated in generalities. Teaching methods were diverse and innovative, and several new combinations of learning activities were created to highlight ethics topics. Content represented managed care and non-managed care topics in varying proportions. Student surveys of attitudes toward managed care and opinions of the ethics programs were the most commonly used as evaluation tools. Some schools were able to develop more direct means of evaluating student learning. The Four Component Model was not fully addressed in the programs developed by the participating schools.

CONCLUSIONS

We make recommendations about the objectives, teaching methods, content, and evaluation methods of an ideal medical school curriculum in ethics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, USA. lol@po.cwru.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14961401

Citation

Lewin, Linda Orkin, et al. "UME-21 and Teaching Ethics: a Step in the Right Direction." Family Medicine, vol. 36 Suppl, 2004, pp. S36-42.
Lewin LO, Olson CA, Goodman KW, et al. UME-21 and teaching ethics: a step in the right direction. Fam Med. 2004;36 Suppl:S36-42.
Lewin, L. O., Olson, C. A., Goodman, K. W., & Kokotailo, P. K. (2004). UME-21 and teaching ethics: a step in the right direction. Family Medicine, 36 Suppl, S36-42.
Lewin LO, et al. UME-21 and Teaching Ethics: a Step in the Right Direction. Fam Med. 2004;36 Suppl:S36-42. PubMed PMID: 14961401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - UME-21 and teaching ethics: a step in the right direction. AU - Lewin,Linda Orkin, AU - Olson,Curtis A, AU - Goodman,Kenneth W, AU - Kokotailo,Patricia K, PY - 2004/2/13/pubmed PY - 2004/8/13/medline PY - 2004/2/13/entrez KW - Bioethics and Professional Ethics SP - S36 EP - 42 JF - Family medicine JO - Fam Med VL - 36 Suppl N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Ethics education for medical students has included a number of relatively vague descriptions of appropriate curricular objectives, but medical schools struggle with the general teaching of ethics, as well as with presenting the ethical dilemmas posed by managed care. This paper proposes some standards and uses them to analyze the general and managed care ethics content of the Undergraduate Medical Education for the 21st Century (UME-21) curricula. METHODS: We analyzed progress and final reports from each school to define their learning objectives, content, teaching methods, and evaluation strategies in ethics. Each was evaluated using principles of adult learning and Rest's Four Component Model of Moral Development. Good examples of curricular elements from participating schools are described. RESULTS: Ethics curricula varied widely among the schools. Goals and objectives were often stated in generalities. Teaching methods were diverse and innovative, and several new combinations of learning activities were created to highlight ethics topics. Content represented managed care and non-managed care topics in varying proportions. Student surveys of attitudes toward managed care and opinions of the ethics programs were the most commonly used as evaluation tools. Some schools were able to develop more direct means of evaluating student learning. The Four Component Model was not fully addressed in the programs developed by the participating schools. CONCLUSIONS: We make recommendations about the objectives, teaching methods, content, and evaluation methods of an ideal medical school curriculum in ethics. SN - 0742-3225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14961401/UME_21_and_teaching_ethics:_a_step_in_the_right_direction_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -