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Promoting the development of doctoring competencies in clinical settings.
Fam Med. 2004 Jan; 36 Suppl:S105-9.FM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

This UME-21 project was developed to promote a variety of clinical competencies during a 12-week medicine clerkship for third-year students.

METHODS

The clerkship is divided into three 4-week rotations--two inpatient rotations and one outpatient rotation. During each rotation, students select a competency, review the module about that competency on the clerkship Web site, and perform a literature search. Learning exercises prompt students to ask their preceptor to model and discuss the performance of the competency on at least one patient and to provide feedback on their performance at least twice. At the end of each rotation, students are required to write about what they learned from the articles they read, write a critical analysis of their performance of the competency on one patient, and complete an evaluation questionnaire. This report is based on the results from the students' evaluation questionnaire.

RESULTS

At the end of the first six rotations, 120 students completed 330 evaluations of the course (93% response rate). The most frequently selected competency modules were behavior modification and patient education. In 81.5% of the evaluations, students felt that there was at least moderate improvement in their ability to perform the selected competency during the rotation. By the end of the rotation, in 85.3% of the evaluations, students indicated that they were confident performing the competency most or almost all of the time. Observing the preceptor was the component of the curriculum most often rated as helpful (59.1%), followed by literature review (57.9%), reviewing the Web site module (45.2%), and observation and feedback by the preceptor (32.7%).

CONCLUSIONS

Based on student reports, the approach described in this paper appears to be a promising way to teach important doctoring competencies in a clinical setting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Drexel University College of Medicine, PA 19102-1192, USA. Dsb25@drexel.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14961412

Citation

Brody, David S., et al. "Promoting the Development of Doctoring Competencies in Clinical Settings." Family Medicine, vol. 36 Suppl, 2004, pp. S105-9.
Brody DS, Ryan K, Kuzma MA. Promoting the development of doctoring competencies in clinical settings. Fam Med. 2004;36 Suppl:S105-9.
Brody, D. S., Ryan, K., & Kuzma, M. A. (2004). Promoting the development of doctoring competencies in clinical settings. Family Medicine, 36 Suppl, S105-9.
Brody DS, Ryan K, Kuzma MA. Promoting the Development of Doctoring Competencies in Clinical Settings. Fam Med. 2004;36 Suppl:S105-9. PubMed PMID: 14961412.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Promoting the development of doctoring competencies in clinical settings. AU - Brody,David S, AU - Ryan,Kathleen, AU - Kuzma,Mary Ann, PY - 2004/2/13/pubmed PY - 2004/8/13/medline PY - 2004/2/13/entrez SP - S105 EP - 9 JF - Family medicine JO - Fam Med VL - 36 Suppl N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This UME-21 project was developed to promote a variety of clinical competencies during a 12-week medicine clerkship for third-year students. METHODS: The clerkship is divided into three 4-week rotations--two inpatient rotations and one outpatient rotation. During each rotation, students select a competency, review the module about that competency on the clerkship Web site, and perform a literature search. Learning exercises prompt students to ask their preceptor to model and discuss the performance of the competency on at least one patient and to provide feedback on their performance at least twice. At the end of each rotation, students are required to write about what they learned from the articles they read, write a critical analysis of their performance of the competency on one patient, and complete an evaluation questionnaire. This report is based on the results from the students' evaluation questionnaire. RESULTS: At the end of the first six rotations, 120 students completed 330 evaluations of the course (93% response rate). The most frequently selected competency modules were behavior modification and patient education. In 81.5% of the evaluations, students felt that there was at least moderate improvement in their ability to perform the selected competency during the rotation. By the end of the rotation, in 85.3% of the evaluations, students indicated that they were confident performing the competency most or almost all of the time. Observing the preceptor was the component of the curriculum most often rated as helpful (59.1%), followed by literature review (57.9%), reviewing the Web site module (45.2%), and observation and feedback by the preceptor (32.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Based on student reports, the approach described in this paper appears to be a promising way to teach important doctoring competencies in a clinical setting. SN - 0742-3225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14961412/Promoting_the_development_of_doctoring_competencies_in_clinical_settings_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -