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Preservation of oral health-related quality of life and salivary flow rates after inverse-planned intensity- modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer.
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2004 Mar 01; 58(3):663-73.IJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

To assess whether comprehensive bilateral neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer results in preserving of oral health-related quality of life and sparing of salivary flow in the first year after therapy.

METHODS AND MATERIALS

Twenty-three patients with head-and-neck cancer (primary sites: nasopharynx [5], oral cavity [12], oropharynx [3], and all others [3]) were accrued to a Phase I-II trial. Inverse planning was carried out with the following treatment goals: at least 1 spared parotid gland (defined as the volume of parotid gland outside the planning target volume [PTV]) to receive a median dose of less than 20 Gy; spinal cord, maximum 45 Gy; PTV(1) to receive a median dose of 50 Gy; PTV(2) to receive a median dose of 60 Gy (postoperative setting, n = 15) or 66-70 Gy (definitive radiotherapy setting, n = 8). Treatment was delivered with 6 and 15 MV photons using a "step-and-shoot" technique on a Varian 2300 EX linac with 120-leaf Millenium MLC. Unstimulated and stimulated whole-mouth salivary flow rates were measured, and patients completed the University of Washington instrument (UWQOL) and a separate xerostomia questionnaire (XQOL) in follow-up.

RESULTS

Early functional outcome end point data are available at the 1-, 3-, and 12-month follow-up time points for 22, 22, and 18 patients, respectively. The combined mean parotid dose was 30.0 Gy (95% confidence interval: 26.9-33.1). The differences from baseline in mean overall UWQOL scores at 1, 3, and 12 months postradiotherapy were -0.24, 0.32, and 4.28, not significantly different from zero (p = 0.89, p = 0.87, p = 0.13). None of the UWQOL individual domain scores related to oral health (pain, eating-chewing, eating-swallowing, and speech) at 1, 3, or 12 months were significantly different from baseline. Both unstimulated and stimulated whole-mouth flow was variably preserved. Unstimulated salivary flow at 1 and 12 months was inversely correlated with combined mean parotid dose (p = 0.014, p = 0.0007), whereas stimulated salivary flow rates at 3 and 12 months were also correlated with combined mean parotid dose (p = 0.025, p = 0.0016). Combined maximum parotid dose was correlated with unstimulated flow rate at 12 months (p = 0.02, r = -0.56) and stimulated flow rate at 1 and 12 months (p = 0.036, r = -0.45; p = 0.0042, r = -0.66). The proportion of patients reporting total XQOL scores of 0 or 1 (no or mild xerostomia) did not diminish significantly from baseline at 1, 3, or 12 months (p = 0.72, p = 0.51, p = 1.0). Unstimulated and stimulated flow at 1 month was inversely correlated with total XQOL score at 12 months (p = 0.025, p = 0.029).

CONCLUSIONS

Oral health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was highly preserved in the initial 12 months after IMRT, as assessed with separate, validated instruments for xerostomia-specific quality of life and oral HRQOL. In general, patients with better-preserved unstimulated salivary flow rates tended to report lower xerostomia scores. Whole-mouth salivary flow rates post IMRT were inversely correlated with combined mean parotid doses. Longer follow-up is required to assess to what extent HRQOL is favorably maintained.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Clinical Trial, Phase I
Clinical Trial, Phase II
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14967418

Citation

Parliament, Matthew B., et al. "Preservation of Oral Health-related Quality of Life and Salivary Flow Rates After Inverse-planned Intensity- Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for Head-and-neck Cancer." International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, vol. 58, no. 3, 2004, pp. 663-73.
Parliament MB, Scrimger RA, Anderson SG, et al. Preservation of oral health-related quality of life and salivary flow rates after inverse-planned intensity- modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2004;58(3):663-73.
Parliament, M. B., Scrimger, R. A., Anderson, S. G., Kurien, E. C., Thompson, H. K., Field, G. C., & Hanson, J. (2004). Preservation of oral health-related quality of life and salivary flow rates after inverse-planned intensity- modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 58(3), 663-73.
Parliament MB, et al. Preservation of Oral Health-related Quality of Life and Salivary Flow Rates After Inverse-planned Intensity- Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for Head-and-neck Cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2004 Mar 1;58(3):663-73. PubMed PMID: 14967418.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preservation of oral health-related quality of life and salivary flow rates after inverse-planned intensity- modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. AU - Parliament,Matthew B, AU - Scrimger,Rufus A, AU - Anderson,Stephanie G, AU - Kurien,Elizabeth C, AU - Thompson,Heather K, AU - Field,G Colin, AU - Hanson,John, PY - 2003/03/28/received PY - 2003/07/03/revised PY - 2003/07/14/accepted PY - 2004/2/18/pubmed PY - 2004/3/25/medline PY - 2004/2/18/entrez SP - 663 EP - 73 JF - International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics JO - Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys VL - 58 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: To assess whether comprehensive bilateral neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer results in preserving of oral health-related quality of life and sparing of salivary flow in the first year after therapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-three patients with head-and-neck cancer (primary sites: nasopharynx [5], oral cavity [12], oropharynx [3], and all others [3]) were accrued to a Phase I-II trial. Inverse planning was carried out with the following treatment goals: at least 1 spared parotid gland (defined as the volume of parotid gland outside the planning target volume [PTV]) to receive a median dose of less than 20 Gy; spinal cord, maximum 45 Gy; PTV(1) to receive a median dose of 50 Gy; PTV(2) to receive a median dose of 60 Gy (postoperative setting, n = 15) or 66-70 Gy (definitive radiotherapy setting, n = 8). Treatment was delivered with 6 and 15 MV photons using a "step-and-shoot" technique on a Varian 2300 EX linac with 120-leaf Millenium MLC. Unstimulated and stimulated whole-mouth salivary flow rates were measured, and patients completed the University of Washington instrument (UWQOL) and a separate xerostomia questionnaire (XQOL) in follow-up. RESULTS: Early functional outcome end point data are available at the 1-, 3-, and 12-month follow-up time points for 22, 22, and 18 patients, respectively. The combined mean parotid dose was 30.0 Gy (95% confidence interval: 26.9-33.1). The differences from baseline in mean overall UWQOL scores at 1, 3, and 12 months postradiotherapy were -0.24, 0.32, and 4.28, not significantly different from zero (p = 0.89, p = 0.87, p = 0.13). None of the UWQOL individual domain scores related to oral health (pain, eating-chewing, eating-swallowing, and speech) at 1, 3, or 12 months were significantly different from baseline. Both unstimulated and stimulated whole-mouth flow was variably preserved. Unstimulated salivary flow at 1 and 12 months was inversely correlated with combined mean parotid dose (p = 0.014, p = 0.0007), whereas stimulated salivary flow rates at 3 and 12 months were also correlated with combined mean parotid dose (p = 0.025, p = 0.0016). Combined maximum parotid dose was correlated with unstimulated flow rate at 12 months (p = 0.02, r = -0.56) and stimulated flow rate at 1 and 12 months (p = 0.036, r = -0.45; p = 0.0042, r = -0.66). The proportion of patients reporting total XQOL scores of 0 or 1 (no or mild xerostomia) did not diminish significantly from baseline at 1, 3, or 12 months (p = 0.72, p = 0.51, p = 1.0). Unstimulated and stimulated flow at 1 month was inversely correlated with total XQOL score at 12 months (p = 0.025, p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS: Oral health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was highly preserved in the initial 12 months after IMRT, as assessed with separate, validated instruments for xerostomia-specific quality of life and oral HRQOL. In general, patients with better-preserved unstimulated salivary flow rates tended to report lower xerostomia scores. Whole-mouth salivary flow rates post IMRT were inversely correlated with combined mean parotid doses. Longer follow-up is required to assess to what extent HRQOL is favorably maintained. SN - 0360-3016 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14967418/Preservation_of_oral_health_related_quality_of_life_and_salivary_flow_rates_after_inverse_planned_intensity__modulated_radiotherapy__IMRT__for_head_and_neck_cancer_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0360301603015712 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -