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Dietary silicon intake is positively associated with bone mineral density in men and premenopausal women of the Framingham Offspring cohort.
J Bone Miner Res 2004; 19(2):297-307JB

Abstract

The role of dietary silicon in bone health in humans is not known. In a cross-sectional, population-based study (2847 participants), associations between dietary silicon intake and BMD were investigated. Dietary silicon correlated positively and significantly with BMD at all hip sites in men and premenopausal women, but not in postmenopausal women, suggesting that increased silicon intake is associated with increased cortical BMD in these populations.

INTRODUCTION

Osteoporosis is a burgeoning health and economic issue. Agents that promote bone formation are widely sought. Animal and cellular data suggest that the orthosilicate anion (i.e., dietary silicon) is involved in bone formation. The intake of silicon (Si, approximately 30 mg/day) is among the highest for trace elements in humans, but its contribution to bone health is not known.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

In a cross-sectional, population-based study, we examined the association between silicon intake and bone mineral density (BMD) in 1251 men and 1596 pre- and postmenopausal women in the Framingham Offspring cohort (age, 30-87 years) at four hip sites and lumbar spine, adjusting for all potential confounding factors known to influence BMD and nutrient intake.

RESULTS

Silicon intake correlated positively with adjusted BMD at four hip sites in men and premenopausal women, but not in postmenopausal women. No significant association was observed at the lumbar spine in any group. Categorical analysis by Si intake, or energy-adjusted Si intake, supported these findings, and showed large differences in BMD (up to 10%) between the highest (> 40 mg Si/day) and lowest (< 14 mg Si/day) quintiles of silicon intake. A significant association at the lumbar spine in men was also observed. Further analyses indicated that some of the effects seen for moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages on BMD might be attributed to Si intake.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that higher dietary silicon intake in men and younger women may have salutary effects on skeletal health, especially cortical bone health, that has not been previously recognized. Confirmation of these results is being sought in a longitudinal study and by assessment of the influence of silicon intake on bone markers in this cohort.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gastrointestinal Laboratory, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom. ravin.jugdaohsingh@kcl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14969400

Citation

Jugdaohsingh, Ravin, et al. "Dietary Silicon Intake Is Positively Associated With Bone Mineral Density in Men and Premenopausal Women of the Framingham Offspring Cohort." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 19, no. 2, 2004, pp. 297-307.
Jugdaohsingh R, Tucker KL, Qiao N, et al. Dietary silicon intake is positively associated with bone mineral density in men and premenopausal women of the Framingham Offspring cohort. J Bone Miner Res. 2004;19(2):297-307.
Jugdaohsingh, R., Tucker, K. L., Qiao, N., Cupples, L. A., Kiel, D. P., & Powell, J. J. (2004). Dietary silicon intake is positively associated with bone mineral density in men and premenopausal women of the Framingham Offspring cohort. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 19(2), pp. 297-307.
Jugdaohsingh R, et al. Dietary Silicon Intake Is Positively Associated With Bone Mineral Density in Men and Premenopausal Women of the Framingham Offspring Cohort. J Bone Miner Res. 2004;19(2):297-307. PubMed PMID: 14969400.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary silicon intake is positively associated with bone mineral density in men and premenopausal women of the Framingham Offspring cohort. AU - Jugdaohsingh,Ravin, AU - Tucker,Katherine L, AU - Qiao,Ning, AU - Cupples,L Adrienne, AU - Kiel,Douglas P, AU - Powell,Jonathan J, Y1 - 2003/12/16/ PY - 2003/04/24/received PY - 2003/08/11/revised PY - 2003/09/10/accepted PY - 2004/2/19/pubmed PY - 2005/7/29/medline PY - 2004/2/19/entrez SP - 297 EP - 307 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - UNLABELLED: The role of dietary silicon in bone health in humans is not known. In a cross-sectional, population-based study (2847 participants), associations between dietary silicon intake and BMD were investigated. Dietary silicon correlated positively and significantly with BMD at all hip sites in men and premenopausal women, but not in postmenopausal women, suggesting that increased silicon intake is associated with increased cortical BMD in these populations. INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a burgeoning health and economic issue. Agents that promote bone formation are widely sought. Animal and cellular data suggest that the orthosilicate anion (i.e., dietary silicon) is involved in bone formation. The intake of silicon (Si, approximately 30 mg/day) is among the highest for trace elements in humans, but its contribution to bone health is not known. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a cross-sectional, population-based study, we examined the association between silicon intake and bone mineral density (BMD) in 1251 men and 1596 pre- and postmenopausal women in the Framingham Offspring cohort (age, 30-87 years) at four hip sites and lumbar spine, adjusting for all potential confounding factors known to influence BMD and nutrient intake. RESULTS: Silicon intake correlated positively with adjusted BMD at four hip sites in men and premenopausal women, but not in postmenopausal women. No significant association was observed at the lumbar spine in any group. Categorical analysis by Si intake, or energy-adjusted Si intake, supported these findings, and showed large differences in BMD (up to 10%) between the highest (> 40 mg Si/day) and lowest (< 14 mg Si/day) quintiles of silicon intake. A significant association at the lumbar spine in men was also observed. Further analyses indicated that some of the effects seen for moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages on BMD might be attributed to Si intake. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that higher dietary silicon intake in men and younger women may have salutary effects on skeletal health, especially cortical bone health, that has not been previously recognized. Confirmation of these results is being sought in a longitudinal study and by assessment of the influence of silicon intake on bone markers in this cohort. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14969400/Dietary_silicon_intake_is_positively_associated_with_bone_mineral_density_in_men_and_premenopausal_women_of_the_Framingham_Offspring_cohort_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.0301225 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -