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Evaluation of intra-articularly administered sodium monoiodoacetate-induced chemical injury to articular cartilage of horses.
Am J Vet Res. 1992 Jul; 53(7):1193-202.AJ

Abstract

Three doses of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) were used to induce degenerative changes in articular cartilage in middle carpal joints of horses. Twelve young (2- to 5-year-old) horses, free of lameness, were randomly allotted to 3 groups. One middle carpal joint of each horse was injected with 0.9% NaCl solution (control joint). The contralateral middle carpal joint was injected with 0.09 mg of MIA/kg of body weight (group 1); 0.12 mg/kg (group 2); or 0.16 mg/kg (group 3). After MIA administration, horses were allowed ad libitum exercise in a 2-acre paddock for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, gross and microscopic tissue changes were evaluated and biochemical analyses of articular cartilage were done. Grossly, diffuse partial-thickness articular cartilage lesions were observed in group-2 (n = 2) and group-3 (n = 4) horses, but not in group-1 horses. Articular cartilage uronic acid content was significantly (P less than 0.03) decreased in all MIA-injected joints, compared with controls. Articular cartilage matrix staining with safranin-O was decreased in 3 of 4 MIA-injected joints of group-1 horses and in all MIA-injected joints of group-2 and group-3 horses, compared with controls (P less than 0.06). Microscopic degenerative changes in articular cartilage were not significantly different between MIA-injected and control joints in group-1 horses, but were increased (P less than 0.06) in all MIA-injected joints of group-2 and group-3 horses, compared with controls. Qualitatively, decreased matrix staining and degenerative changes were more severe in group-3 horses. On the basis of articular cartilage gross and microscopic changes, as well as biochemical changes, 0.12 mg of MIA/kg injected intra-articularly was determined to induce moderate degrees of articular cartilage degeneration. This model of chemically induced articular cartilage injury could be useful for evaluating treatment effects of anti-arthritic drugs in horses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80523.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1497191

Citation

Gustafson, S B., et al. "Evaluation of Intra-articularly Administered Sodium Monoiodoacetate-induced Chemical Injury to Articular Cartilage of Horses." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 53, no. 7, 1992, pp. 1193-202.
Gustafson SB, Trotter GW, Norrdin RW, et al. Evaluation of intra-articularly administered sodium monoiodoacetate-induced chemical injury to articular cartilage of horses. Am J Vet Res. 1992;53(7):1193-202.
Gustafson, S. B., Trotter, G. W., Norrdin, R. W., Wrigley, R. H., & Lamar, C. (1992). Evaluation of intra-articularly administered sodium monoiodoacetate-induced chemical injury to articular cartilage of horses. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 53(7), 1193-202.
Gustafson SB, et al. Evaluation of Intra-articularly Administered Sodium Monoiodoacetate-induced Chemical Injury to Articular Cartilage of Horses. Am J Vet Res. 1992;53(7):1193-202. PubMed PMID: 1497191.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of intra-articularly administered sodium monoiodoacetate-induced chemical injury to articular cartilage of horses. AU - Gustafson,S B, AU - Trotter,G W, AU - Norrdin,R W, AU - Wrigley,R H, AU - Lamar,C, PY - 1992/7/1/pubmed PY - 1992/7/1/medline PY - 1992/7/1/entrez SP - 1193 EP - 202 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am. J. Vet. Res. VL - 53 IS - 7 N2 - Three doses of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) were used to induce degenerative changes in articular cartilage in middle carpal joints of horses. Twelve young (2- to 5-year-old) horses, free of lameness, were randomly allotted to 3 groups. One middle carpal joint of each horse was injected with 0.9% NaCl solution (control joint). The contralateral middle carpal joint was injected with 0.09 mg of MIA/kg of body weight (group 1); 0.12 mg/kg (group 2); or 0.16 mg/kg (group 3). After MIA administration, horses were allowed ad libitum exercise in a 2-acre paddock for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, gross and microscopic tissue changes were evaluated and biochemical analyses of articular cartilage were done. Grossly, diffuse partial-thickness articular cartilage lesions were observed in group-2 (n = 2) and group-3 (n = 4) horses, but not in group-1 horses. Articular cartilage uronic acid content was significantly (P less than 0.03) decreased in all MIA-injected joints, compared with controls. Articular cartilage matrix staining with safranin-O was decreased in 3 of 4 MIA-injected joints of group-1 horses and in all MIA-injected joints of group-2 and group-3 horses, compared with controls (P less than 0.06). Microscopic degenerative changes in articular cartilage were not significantly different between MIA-injected and control joints in group-1 horses, but were increased (P less than 0.06) in all MIA-injected joints of group-2 and group-3 horses, compared with controls. Qualitatively, decreased matrix staining and degenerative changes were more severe in group-3 horses. On the basis of articular cartilage gross and microscopic changes, as well as biochemical changes, 0.12 mg of MIA/kg injected intra-articularly was determined to induce moderate degrees of articular cartilage degeneration. This model of chemically induced articular cartilage injury could be useful for evaluating treatment effects of anti-arthritic drugs in horses. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1497191/Evaluation_of_intra_articularly_administered_sodium_monoiodoacetate_induced_chemical_injury_to_articular_cartilage_of_horses_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/osteoarthritis.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -