Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Plasma and dietary carotenoids, and the risk of prostate cancer: a nested case-control study.

Abstract

The association between plasma carotenoids and prostate cancer risk was investigated in a case-control study nested within the prospective Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We matched 450 incident prostate cancer cases diagnosed from 1993-1998 to 450 controls by age, time, month, and year of blood donation. Modest inverse, but not statistically significant, associations were observed among plasma alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene concentrations, and overall risk of prostate cancer diagnosis [odds ratio (highest versus lowest quintile; OR), alpha-carotene: OR, 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI), -0.40-1.09]; beta-carotene: OR, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.48-1.25); lycopene: OR, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.38-1.13)]. The inverse association between plasma lycopene concentrations and prostate cancer risk was limited to participants who were 65 years or older (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.23-0.98) and without a family history of prostate cancer (OR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26-0.89). Combining, older age and a negative family history provided similar results (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.18-1.02). Inverse associations between beta-carotene and prostate cancer risk were also found among younger participants (<65 years of age; OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14-0.91; P(trend) = 0.03). Combining dietary intake and plasma data confirmed our results. We found a statistically significant inverse association between higher plasma lycopene concentrations and lower risk of prostate cancer, which was restricted to older participants and those without a family history of prostate cancer. This observation suggests that tomato products may exhibit more potent protection against sporadic prostate cancer rather than those with a stronger familial or hereditary component. In addition, our findings also suggest that among younger men, diets rich in beta-carotene may also play a protective role in prostate carcinogenesis.

Links

  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. kana.wu@channing.harvard.edu

    , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Carotenoids
    Case-Control Studies
    Diet
    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Pedigree
    Prostatic Neoplasms
    Risk Assessment

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    14973107

    Citation

    Wu, Kana, et al. "Plasma and Dietary Carotenoids, and the Risk of Prostate Cancer: a Nested Case-control Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 13, no. 2, 2004, pp. 260-9.
    Wu K, Erdman JW, Schwartz SJ, et al. Plasma and dietary carotenoids, and the risk of prostate cancer: a nested case-control study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004;13(2):260-9.
    Wu, K., Erdman, J. W., Schwartz, S. J., Platz, E. A., Leitzmann, M., Clinton, S. K., ... Giovannucci, E. (2004). Plasma and dietary carotenoids, and the risk of prostate cancer: a nested case-control study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 13(2), pp. 260-9.
    Wu K, et al. Plasma and Dietary Carotenoids, and the Risk of Prostate Cancer: a Nested Case-control Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004;13(2):260-9. PubMed PMID: 14973107.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma and dietary carotenoids, and the risk of prostate cancer: a nested case-control study. AU - Wu,Kana, AU - Erdman,John W,Jr AU - Schwartz,Steven J, AU - Platz,Elizabeth A, AU - Leitzmann,Michael, AU - Clinton,Steven K, AU - DeGroff,Valerie, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, PY - 2004/2/20/pubmed PY - 2004/5/28/medline PY - 2004/2/20/entrez SP - 260 EP - 9 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 13 IS - 2 N2 - The association between plasma carotenoids and prostate cancer risk was investigated in a case-control study nested within the prospective Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We matched 450 incident prostate cancer cases diagnosed from 1993-1998 to 450 controls by age, time, month, and year of blood donation. Modest inverse, but not statistically significant, associations were observed among plasma alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene concentrations, and overall risk of prostate cancer diagnosis [odds ratio (highest versus lowest quintile; OR), alpha-carotene: OR, 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI), -0.40-1.09]; beta-carotene: OR, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.48-1.25); lycopene: OR, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.38-1.13)]. The inverse association between plasma lycopene concentrations and prostate cancer risk was limited to participants who were 65 years or older (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.23-0.98) and without a family history of prostate cancer (OR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26-0.89). Combining, older age and a negative family history provided similar results (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.18-1.02). Inverse associations between beta-carotene and prostate cancer risk were also found among younger participants (<65 years of age; OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14-0.91; P(trend) = 0.03). Combining dietary intake and plasma data confirmed our results. We found a statistically significant inverse association between higher plasma lycopene concentrations and lower risk of prostate cancer, which was restricted to older participants and those without a family history of prostate cancer. This observation suggests that tomato products may exhibit more potent protection against sporadic prostate cancer rather than those with a stronger familial or hereditary component. In addition, our findings also suggest that among younger men, diets rich in beta-carotene may also play a protective role in prostate carcinogenesis. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14973107/Plasma_and_dietary_carotenoids_and_the_risk_of_prostate_cancer:_a_nested_case_control_study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=14973107 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -