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Feverfew for preventing migraine.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2004; (1):CD002286CD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) extract is a herbal remedy used for preventing attacks of migraine.

OBJECTIVES

To systematically review the evidence from double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the clinical efficacy and safety of feverfew versus placebo for preventing migraine.

SEARCH STRATEGY

Publications describing (or which might describe) double-blind RCTs of feverfew extract for migraine were sought through the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2003); PREMEDLINE/MEDLINE (1966 to July 2003); EMBASE (1974 to July 2003); the trials register of the Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive care group (July 2003); and AMED (1985 to July 2003). Manufacturers of feverfew were contacted and the bibliographies of identified articles checked for further trials.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials assessing the efficacy of feverfew for preventing migraine were included. Trials using clinical outcome measures were included. Trials focusing exclusively on physiological parameters were excluded. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS

Data on patients, interventions, methods, outcome measures, results and adverse events were extracted systematically. Methodological quality was evaluated using the scoring system developed by Jadad and colleagues. Two reviewers independently selected studies, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Disagreements concerning evaluation of individual trials were resolved through discussion.

MAIN RESULTS

Five trials (343 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Results from these trials were mixed and did not convincingly establish that feverfew is efficacious for preventing migraine. Only mild and transient adverse events were reported in the included trials.

REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS

There is insufficient evidence from randomised, double-blind trials to suggest an effect of feverfew over and above placebo for preventing migraine. It appears from the data reviewed that feverfew presents no major safety problems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, 25 Victoria Park Road, Exeter, Devon, UK, EX2 4NT.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14973986

Citation

Pittler, M H., and E Ernst. "Feverfew for Preventing Migraine." The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2004, p. CD002286.
Pittler MH, Ernst E. Feverfew for preventing migraine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004.
Pittler, M. H., & Ernst, E. (2004). Feverfew for preventing migraine. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (1), p. CD002286.
Pittler MH, Ernst E. Feverfew for Preventing Migraine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(1)CD002286. PubMed PMID: 14973986.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feverfew for preventing migraine. AU - Pittler,M H, AU - Ernst,E, PY - 2004/2/20/pubmed PY - 2004/6/30/medline PY - 2004/2/20/entrez SP - CD002286 EP - CD002286 JF - The Cochrane database of systematic reviews JO - Cochrane Database Syst Rev IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) extract is a herbal remedy used for preventing attacks of migraine. OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the evidence from double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the clinical efficacy and safety of feverfew versus placebo for preventing migraine. SEARCH STRATEGY: Publications describing (or which might describe) double-blind RCTs of feverfew extract for migraine were sought through the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2003); PREMEDLINE/MEDLINE (1966 to July 2003); EMBASE (1974 to July 2003); the trials register of the Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive care group (July 2003); and AMED (1985 to July 2003). Manufacturers of feverfew were contacted and the bibliographies of identified articles checked for further trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials assessing the efficacy of feverfew for preventing migraine were included. Trials using clinical outcome measures were included. Trials focusing exclusively on physiological parameters were excluded. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data on patients, interventions, methods, outcome measures, results and adverse events were extracted systematically. Methodological quality was evaluated using the scoring system developed by Jadad and colleagues. Two reviewers independently selected studies, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Disagreements concerning evaluation of individual trials were resolved through discussion. MAIN RESULTS: Five trials (343 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Results from these trials were mixed and did not convincingly establish that feverfew is efficacious for preventing migraine. Only mild and transient adverse events were reported in the included trials. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence from randomised, double-blind trials to suggest an effect of feverfew over and above placebo for preventing migraine. It appears from the data reviewed that feverfew presents no major safety problems. SN - 1469-493X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14973986/Feverfew_for_preventing_migraine_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD002286.pub2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -