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Moderate alcoholic beverage intake and early nuclear and cortical lens opacities.

Abstract

PURPOSE

To study the relationship between alcoholic beverage intake and early lens opacities.

METHODS

556 Boston-area women aged 53-74 years were sampled from the Nurses' Health Study cohort. Degree of opacity was assessed by eye examinations including lens photography.

RESULTS

After multivariate adjustment, the odds of a nuclear opacity grade > or =2.3 increased by 30% (OR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.10-1.54) per 10-g increase in total alcohol intake. Furthermore, after control for intake of other alcoholic beverages, the odds of a higher nuclear opacity grade increased by 13% (OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.02-1.26) for every two additional hard-alcoholic drinks consumed per week, and by 17% (OR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.03-1.33) for every two additional glasses of wine consumed per week. The odds of a cortical opacity grade > or =0.4 decreased by 12% (OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.79-0.98) for every two additional glasses of wine consumed per week, but intake of other alcoholic beverages was unrelated to cortical opacity.

CONCLUSIONS

Consumption of alcoholic beverages, particularly hard liquor and wine, was positively related to nuclear opacity. Wine drinking was inversely related to cortical opacity.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Channing Laboratory, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

    , , , ,

    Source

    Ophthalmic epidemiology 11:1 2004 Feb pg 53-65

    MeSH

    Aged
    Alcohol Drinking
    Boston
    Cataract
    Female
    Humans
    Lens Cortex, Crystalline
    Lens Nucleus, Crystalline
    Middle Aged
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    14977497

    Citation

    Morris, Martha Savaria, et al. "Moderate Alcoholic Beverage Intake and Early Nuclear and Cortical Lens Opacities." Ophthalmic Epidemiology, vol. 11, no. 1, 2004, pp. 53-65.
    Morris MS, Jacques PF, Hankinson SE, et al. Moderate alcoholic beverage intake and early nuclear and cortical lens opacities. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2004;11(1):53-65.
    Morris, M. S., Jacques, P. F., Hankinson, S. E., Chylack, L. T., Willett, W. C., & Taylor, A. (2004). Moderate alcoholic beverage intake and early nuclear and cortical lens opacities. Ophthalmic Epidemiology, 11(1), pp. 53-65.
    Morris MS, et al. Moderate Alcoholic Beverage Intake and Early Nuclear and Cortical Lens Opacities. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2004;11(1):53-65. PubMed PMID: 14977497.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Moderate alcoholic beverage intake and early nuclear and cortical lens opacities. AU - Morris,Martha Savaria, AU - Jacques,Paul F, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Chylack,Leo T,Jr AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Taylor,Allen, PY - 2004/2/24/pubmed PY - 2004/4/16/medline PY - 2004/2/24/entrez SP - 53 EP - 65 JF - Ophthalmic epidemiology JO - Ophthalmic Epidemiol VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: To study the relationship between alcoholic beverage intake and early lens opacities. METHODS: 556 Boston-area women aged 53-74 years were sampled from the Nurses' Health Study cohort. Degree of opacity was assessed by eye examinations including lens photography. RESULTS: After multivariate adjustment, the odds of a nuclear opacity grade > or =2.3 increased by 30% (OR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.10-1.54) per 10-g increase in total alcohol intake. Furthermore, after control for intake of other alcoholic beverages, the odds of a higher nuclear opacity grade increased by 13% (OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.02-1.26) for every two additional hard-alcoholic drinks consumed per week, and by 17% (OR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.03-1.33) for every two additional glasses of wine consumed per week. The odds of a cortical opacity grade > or =0.4 decreased by 12% (OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.79-0.98) for every two additional glasses of wine consumed per week, but intake of other alcoholic beverages was unrelated to cortical opacity. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of alcoholic beverages, particularly hard liquor and wine, was positively related to nuclear opacity. Wine drinking was inversely related to cortical opacity. SN - 0928-6586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14977497/full_citation L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1076/opep.11.1.53.26439 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -