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Clinical effects of naltrexone on autistic behavior.
Am J Ment Retard. 1992 Jul; 97(1):57-63.AJ

Abstract

Eight young adults who were diagnosed with autism were given the opiate antagonist naltrexone to control self-injurious behavior and maladaptive idiosyncratic mannerisms. The drug and placebo were administered in a double-blind crossover design over 17 weeks. Although one subject appeared to have partial decreases in maladaptive behaviors associated with naltrexone use, the drugs, as administered in this study, did not reduce the self-injurious and other maladaptive behaviors of the subjects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sonoma Developmental Center, Eldridge, CA 95431.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1497864

Citation

Zingarelli, G, et al. "Clinical Effects of Naltrexone On Autistic Behavior." American Journal of Mental Retardation : AJMR, vol. 97, no. 1, 1992, pp. 57-63.
Zingarelli G, Ellman G, Hom A, et al. Clinical effects of naltrexone on autistic behavior. Am J Ment Retard. 1992;97(1):57-63.
Zingarelli, G., Ellman, G., Hom, A., Wymore, M., Heidorn, S., & Chicz-DeMet, A. (1992). Clinical effects of naltrexone on autistic behavior. American Journal of Mental Retardation : AJMR, 97(1), 57-63.
Zingarelli G, et al. Clinical Effects of Naltrexone On Autistic Behavior. Am J Ment Retard. 1992;97(1):57-63. PubMed PMID: 1497864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical effects of naltrexone on autistic behavior. AU - Zingarelli,G, AU - Ellman,G, AU - Hom,A, AU - Wymore,M, AU - Heidorn,S, AU - Chicz-DeMet,A, PY - 1992/7/1/pubmed PY - 1992/7/1/medline PY - 1992/7/1/entrez SP - 57 EP - 63 JF - American journal of mental retardation : AJMR JO - Am J Ment Retard VL - 97 IS - 1 N2 - Eight young adults who were diagnosed with autism were given the opiate antagonist naltrexone to control self-injurious behavior and maladaptive idiosyncratic mannerisms. The drug and placebo were administered in a double-blind crossover design over 17 weeks. Although one subject appeared to have partial decreases in maladaptive behaviors associated with naltrexone use, the drugs, as administered in this study, did not reduce the self-injurious and other maladaptive behaviors of the subjects. SN - 0895-8017 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1497864/Clinical_effects_of_naltrexone_on_autistic_behavior_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/selfharm.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -