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Management of acute sunburn.
Am J Clin Dermatol. 2004; 5(1):39-47.AJ

Abstract

Current literature documents the use of many pharmacologic agents in the management of acute sunburn. While numerous studies have been undertaken, there is no consensus on an algorithm for such treatment. We review the literature for an evidence-based approach to the management of sunburn. A MEDLINE search was conducted whereby all published articles related to sunburn or ultraviolet (UV)-induced erythema from 1966-2001 were evaluated. Studies and reviews were excluded if they were not conducted in human beings. The results of these studies are varying and often conflicting in terms of clinical effectiveness or feasibility. A total of 40 studies were reviewed. Fourteen out of the 40 studies addressed the actual treatment of sunburn (i.e. the application of a substance after the development of signs or symptoms). The majority concluded that either corticosteroids, NSAIDs, antioxidants, antihistamines or emollients were ineffective at decreasing recovery time. The remaining studies showed mild improvement with such treatments, but study designs or methods were flawed. Furthermore, regardless of the treatment modality, the damage to epidermal cells is the same. Given the lack of convincing data and consensus of opinion regarding sunburn management, the most effective and practical approach to acute sunburn is symptomatic treatment of UV light-induced symptoms, including erythema, pain and pruritus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco 94143-0989, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14979742

Citation

Han, Amy, and Howard I. Maibach. "Management of Acute Sunburn." American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, vol. 5, no. 1, 2004, pp. 39-47.
Han A, Maibach HI. Management of acute sunburn. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2004;5(1):39-47.
Han, A., & Maibach, H. I. (2004). Management of acute sunburn. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 5(1), 39-47.
Han A, Maibach HI. Management of Acute Sunburn. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2004;5(1):39-47. PubMed PMID: 14979742.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of acute sunburn. AU - Han,Amy, AU - Maibach,Howard I, PY - 2004/2/26/pubmed PY - 2004/6/4/medline PY - 2004/2/26/entrez SP - 39 EP - 47 JF - American journal of clinical dermatology JO - Am J Clin Dermatol VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - Current literature documents the use of many pharmacologic agents in the management of acute sunburn. While numerous studies have been undertaken, there is no consensus on an algorithm for such treatment. We review the literature for an evidence-based approach to the management of sunburn. A MEDLINE search was conducted whereby all published articles related to sunburn or ultraviolet (UV)-induced erythema from 1966-2001 were evaluated. Studies and reviews were excluded if they were not conducted in human beings. The results of these studies are varying and often conflicting in terms of clinical effectiveness or feasibility. A total of 40 studies were reviewed. Fourteen out of the 40 studies addressed the actual treatment of sunburn (i.e. the application of a substance after the development of signs or symptoms). The majority concluded that either corticosteroids, NSAIDs, antioxidants, antihistamines or emollients were ineffective at decreasing recovery time. The remaining studies showed mild improvement with such treatments, but study designs or methods were flawed. Furthermore, regardless of the treatment modality, the damage to epidermal cells is the same. Given the lack of convincing data and consensus of opinion regarding sunburn management, the most effective and practical approach to acute sunburn is symptomatic treatment of UV light-induced symptoms, including erythema, pain and pruritus. SN - 1175-0561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14979742/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2165/00128071-200405010-00006 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -