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Influence of interhemispheric interactions on motor function in chronic stroke.
Ann Neurol. 2004 Mar; 55(3):400-9.AN

Abstract

In patients with chronic stroke, the primary motor cortex of the intact hemisphere (M1(intact hemisphere)) may influence functional recovery, possibly through transcallosal effects exerted over M1 in the lesioned hemisphere (M1(lesioned hemisphere)). Here, we studied interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) between M1(intact hemisphere) and M1(lesioned hemisphere) in the process of generation of a voluntary movement by the paretic hand in patients with chronic subcortical stroke and in healthy volunteers. IHI was evaluated in both hands preceding the onset of unilateral voluntary index finger movements (paretic hand in patients, right hand in controls) in a simple reaction time paradigm. IHI at rest and shortly after the Go signal were comparable in patients and controls. Closer to movement onset, IHI targeting the moving index finger turned into facilitation in controls but remained deep in patients, a finding that correlated with poor motor performance. These results document an abnormally high interhemispheric inhibitory drive from M1(intact hemisphere) to M1(lesioned hemisphere) in the process of generation of a voluntary movement by the paretic hand. It is conceivable that this abnormality could adversely influence motor recovery in some patients with subcortical stroke, an interpretation consistent with models of interhemispheric competition in motor and sensory systems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Cortical Physiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20817, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14991818

Citation

Murase, Nagako, et al. "Influence of Interhemispheric Interactions On Motor Function in Chronic Stroke." Annals of Neurology, vol. 55, no. 3, 2004, pp. 400-9.
Murase N, Duque J, Mazzocchio R, et al. Influence of interhemispheric interactions on motor function in chronic stroke. Ann Neurol. 2004;55(3):400-9.
Murase, N., Duque, J., Mazzocchio, R., & Cohen, L. G. (2004). Influence of interhemispheric interactions on motor function in chronic stroke. Annals of Neurology, 55(3), 400-9.
Murase N, et al. Influence of Interhemispheric Interactions On Motor Function in Chronic Stroke. Ann Neurol. 2004;55(3):400-9. PubMed PMID: 14991818.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of interhemispheric interactions on motor function in chronic stroke. AU - Murase,Nagako, AU - Duque,Julie, AU - Mazzocchio,Riccardo, AU - Cohen,Leonardo G, PY - 2004/3/3/pubmed PY - 2004/4/13/medline PY - 2004/3/3/entrez SP - 400 EP - 9 JF - Annals of neurology JO - Ann Neurol VL - 55 IS - 3 N2 - In patients with chronic stroke, the primary motor cortex of the intact hemisphere (M1(intact hemisphere)) may influence functional recovery, possibly through transcallosal effects exerted over M1 in the lesioned hemisphere (M1(lesioned hemisphere)). Here, we studied interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) between M1(intact hemisphere) and M1(lesioned hemisphere) in the process of generation of a voluntary movement by the paretic hand in patients with chronic subcortical stroke and in healthy volunteers. IHI was evaluated in both hands preceding the onset of unilateral voluntary index finger movements (paretic hand in patients, right hand in controls) in a simple reaction time paradigm. IHI at rest and shortly after the Go signal were comparable in patients and controls. Closer to movement onset, IHI targeting the moving index finger turned into facilitation in controls but remained deep in patients, a finding that correlated with poor motor performance. These results document an abnormally high interhemispheric inhibitory drive from M1(intact hemisphere) to M1(lesioned hemisphere) in the process of generation of a voluntary movement by the paretic hand. It is conceivable that this abnormality could adversely influence motor recovery in some patients with subcortical stroke, an interpretation consistent with models of interhemispheric competition in motor and sensory systems. SN - 0364-5134 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14991818/Influence_of_interhemispheric_interactions_on_motor_function_in_chronic_stroke_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -