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Heme iron, zinc, alcohol consumption, and colon cancer: Iowa Women's Health Study.

Abstract

We examined associations among colon cancer incidence and dietary intake of heme iron, a possible prooxidant, zinc, a possible antioxidant, and alcohol, a disruptor of iron homeostasis. During 15 years of follow-up, 34 708 postmenopausal women, aged 55-69 years at baseline who completed a food-frequency questionnaire for the Iowa Women's Health Study, were followed for incident colon cancer. After adjusting for each micronutrient, the relative risks for proximal colon cancer increased more than twofold across categories of heme iron intake (P(trend) =.01) and the corresponding relative risks decreased more than 50% across categories for zinc intake (P(trend) =.01). The positive association with heme iron and the inverse association with zinc intake were stronger among women who consumed alcohol than among those who did not. Zinc intake was also associated with a decreased risk of distal colon cancer (P(trend) =.03), regardless of alcohol or heme iron consumption. Our results suggest that intake of dietary heme iron is associated with an increased risk of proximal colon cancer, especially among women who drink, but that intake of dietary zinc is associated with a decreased risk of both proximal and distal colon cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Alcohol Drinking
    Anticarcinogenic Agents
    Antioxidants
    Carcinogens
    Colonic Neoplasms
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Health Surveys
    Hemoglobins
    Humans
    Incidence
    Iowa
    Iron, Dietary
    Medical Record Linkage
    Middle Aged
    Oxidants
    Registries
    Research Design
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Women's Health
    Zinc Compounds

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    14996862

    Citation

    Lee, Duk-Hee, et al. "Heme Iron, Zinc, Alcohol Consumption, and Colon Cancer: Iowa Women's Health Study." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 96, no. 5, 2004, pp. 403-7.
    Lee DH, Anderson KE, Harnack LJ, et al. Heme iron, zinc, alcohol consumption, and colon cancer: Iowa Women's Health Study. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004;96(5):403-7.
    Lee, D. H., Anderson, K. E., Harnack, L. J., Folsom, A. R., & Jacobs, D. R. (2004). Heme iron, zinc, alcohol consumption, and colon cancer: Iowa Women's Health Study. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 96(5), pp. 403-7.
    Lee DH, et al. Heme Iron, Zinc, Alcohol Consumption, and Colon Cancer: Iowa Women's Health Study. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Mar 3;96(5):403-7. PubMed PMID: 14996862.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Heme iron, zinc, alcohol consumption, and colon cancer: Iowa Women's Health Study. AU - Lee,Duk-Hee, AU - Anderson,Kristin E, AU - Harnack,Lisa J, AU - Folsom,Aaron R, AU - Jacobs,David R,Jr PY - 2004/3/5/pubmed PY - 2004/3/16/medline PY - 2004/3/5/entrez SP - 403 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 96 IS - 5 N2 - We examined associations among colon cancer incidence and dietary intake of heme iron, a possible prooxidant, zinc, a possible antioxidant, and alcohol, a disruptor of iron homeostasis. During 15 years of follow-up, 34 708 postmenopausal women, aged 55-69 years at baseline who completed a food-frequency questionnaire for the Iowa Women's Health Study, were followed for incident colon cancer. After adjusting for each micronutrient, the relative risks for proximal colon cancer increased more than twofold across categories of heme iron intake (P(trend) =.01) and the corresponding relative risks decreased more than 50% across categories for zinc intake (P(trend) =.01). The positive association with heme iron and the inverse association with zinc intake were stronger among women who consumed alcohol than among those who did not. Zinc intake was also associated with a decreased risk of distal colon cancer (P(trend) =.03), regardless of alcohol or heme iron consumption. Our results suggest that intake of dietary heme iron is associated with an increased risk of proximal colon cancer, especially among women who drink, but that intake of dietary zinc is associated with a decreased risk of both proximal and distal colon cancer. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14996862/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djh047 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -